OxfordCroquet Logo

Dr Ian Plummer

Donation Button

http://oxfordcroquet.com/laws/6th/full/6th.asp
Technical

INTERNATIONAL LAWS REVISION COMMITTEE

LAWS

OF

ASSOCIATION CROQUET

6th EDITION - AMENDED January 2008

Copyright © The Croquet Association, 2000, on behalf of itself and the Australian Croquet Association, Croquet New Zealand and the United States Croquet Association)

This document may be reproduced by individuals for their own use.

Published by
The Croquet Association
C/o Cheltenham Croquet Club
Old Bath Road
Cheltenham
GL53 7DF
T: 01242 242318
E: caoffice@croquet.org.uk
http://www.croquet.org.uk
August 2000


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 1 INTRODUCTION

A. OUTLINE OF THE GAME
1. An outline of the game

B. THE COURT AND EQUIPMENT
2. The court
3. Equipment and accessories

C. DEFINITIONS
4. Start and end of a game and turn
5. A stroke and the striking period
6. States of a ball
7. Outside agencies

PART 2 ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY

A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY
8. The start of a game
9. Election of striker's ball
10. Ball off the court
11. Ball in the yard-line area
12. Placement Replacement of a ball off the court or in the yard-line area
13. Wiring lift
14. Hoop point
15. Peg point
16. Roquet
17. Hoop and roquet situations
18. Consequences of a roquet
19. Placing balls for a croquet stroke
20. Croquet stroke
21. Continuation stroke

B. ERRORS IN PLAY
22. General principles
23. Forestalling play
24. Compound errors
25. Playing when not entitled to do so
26. Playing a wrong ball
27. Playing when a ball is misplaced
28. Faults

C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY
29. General principles
30. Balls wrongly removed or not removed from the game
31. Misplaced clips and misleading information
32. Playing when forestalled
33. Interference with the position of a ball
34. Interference with the playing of a stroke
35. Miscellaneous interference

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY

A. ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY
36. Optional lift or contact

B. HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY
37. Bisques
38. Pegging out in handicap games
39. Restoration of bisques after certain errors

C. DOUBLES PLAY
40. General
41. Ordinary doubles play
42. Advanced doubles play
43. Handicap doubles play

D. SHORTENED GAMES
44. Shortened games
45. Advanced play in shortened games
46. Handicap play in shortened games

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME

A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT
47. The state of the game
48. Referees of the game
49. Expedition in play
50. Advice and aids
51. Miscellaneous laws of conduct

B. SPECIAL LAWS
52. Double-banked play
53. Tournament and match play
54. Local laws
55. Overriding law  

APPENDICES

1. Tolerances and metric equivalents of standard dimensions
2. Ball performance specifications
3. Full bisque handicap play
4. Alternate stroke handicap doubles play
5. Advanced handicap play
6. One-ball play
7. Short croquet
8. Schedule of bisques

INDEX
AB CD EF GH IJ KL MN OP QR ST UW Y

PART 1 INTRODUCTION A. AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME

1. AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME

  1. SCOPE This law gives a brief outline of the game and the Laws of Association Croquet. Its provisions are subject to the more detailed laws that follow.
  2. THE SIDES The game is played between two sides, of which one plays the blue and black and the other the red and yellow balls (or green and brown versus pink and white). A game may be either singles, in which each player plays both balls of the side, or doubles, in which each player of the side plays one ball and may strike only that ball.
  3. THE OBJECT OF THE GAME The object is for each side to make both its balls score 12 hoop points and a peg point, a total of 26 points, before the other side. A ball scores a hoop point (see Law 14) by passing through the correct hoop in the order 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, then 1-back, 2-back, 3-back, 4-back, penultimate and rover in the direction shown in Diagram 1. This is also known as running a hoop in order. A ball that has scored all 12 hoop points is known as a rover. It may then score a peg point (see Law 15 and, for handicap play, Law 38) by hitting the peg and is then said to be pegged out and is removed from the game.


  4. PLAYING THE GAME The game is played by striking a ball with a mallet. The player whose turn it is to play is known as the striker, the ball that he strikes during the turn as the strikerís ball and the other ball of his side as the partner ball. The striker must never strike the partner ball or a ball of the other side. By striking the strikerís ball, the striker may cause it and other balls to move and score hoop or peg points although only if the strikerís ball is a rover may it cause another rover to score a peg point.
  5. THE TURN
    1. The sides play alternate turns. Each turn may be played with either ball of the side. The striker is initially entitled to play one stroke, after which the turn ends unless in that stroke the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself or hits another ball.
    2. If the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself, the striker becomes entitled to play one extra stroke which is known as a continuation stroke (see Law 21).
    3. If the striker's ball hits another ball, it is said to roquet that other ball and the striker becomes entitled to play a croquet stroke (see Law 20).
    4. A croquet stroke is played by placing the striker's ball in contact with the roqueted ball (see Law 19) and then striking it so that both balls move or at least shake.
    5. After playing a croquet stroke the striker becomes entitled to play a continuation stroke.
    6. At the start of each turn the strikerís ball may roquet and take croquet from each of the other three balls once. However, every time the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself, it may roquet and take croquet from each of the other three balls again. It is therefore possible for the striker to become entitled to play a series of strokes in a turn in which the strikerís ball may score one or more points for itself.
  6. HANDICAP GAMES In handicap play, the weaker side receives a number of extra turns or bisques (see Law 37).
  7. DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES In double-banked play, two games are played simultaneously on the same court using differently coloured sets of balls (see Law 52).
  8. TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY In tournament and match play, additional laws and regulations apply (see Law 53).

PART 1
INTRODUCTION
B. THE COURT AND EQUIPMENT

2. THE COURT

  1. THE STANDARD COURT
    1. COURT LAYOUT The standard court is a rectangle measuring 28 by 35 yards (see Diagram 1). Its boundary must be clearly marked, the inner edge of the marking being the actual boundary.
    2. BOUNDARIES The boundaries are known as the north, south, east and west boundaries regardless of the actual orientation of the court.
    3. YARD-LINE The perimeter of an inner rectangle whose sides are parallel to and one yard from the boundary is called the yard-line, its corners the corner spots and the space between the yard-line and the boundary the yard-line area. The yard-line is not marked on the court. Certain balls which leave the court or come to rest in the yard-line area are placed replaced on the yard-line.
    4. BAULK-LINES The parts of the yard-line that extend from the corner spots at corners 1 and 3 to a line extended through the centres of hoops 5 and 6 are known as the A and B baulk-lines respectively. The ends of the baulk-lines may be marked on the boundary but any raised markers used must not intrude or lean into the court. The baulk lines are where a ball may be placed before it is played into the game under Law 8(b) (start of game) or played under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift in advanced play)).
    5. THE STANDARD SETTING The peg is set in the centre of the court. There are six hoops which are set parallel to the north and south boundaries; the centres of the two inner hoops are 7 yards to the north and south of the peg; the centres of the four outer hoops are 7 yards from the adjacent boundaries.
  2. VARIATIONS TO THE STANDARD COURT
    1. COURT LAYOUT The length and width of the court are each subject to the tolerances set out in Appendix 1 provided the court remains a rectangle. Where more than one boundary marking is visible and it is not obvious which one should be used, the most recent defines the true boundary or, if that cannot be determined, the innermost defines the true boundary. Exceptional cases may be dealt with under Law 55. The actual boundary at any point is the straight line which best fits the inner edge of the boundary marking in the vicinity of that point.
    2. MOVABLE BOUNDARY MARKING The boundary may be marked with a movable cord, which should be fastened to the court at several intermediate points. If the cord is displaced, Law 35(d) applies.
    3. YARD-LINE Where a boundary marking is not straight, the yard-line is taken to be a line one yard inside and parallel to the boundary. However, where it is critical that balls that have been or are to be placed on the yard-line lie on the straight line joining the corner spots, their positions should be adjusted by the minimum amount necessary to ensure that they do so.
    4. TOLERANCE ON SETTING Each hoop and the peg may be displaced up to 6 inches from its standard position provided that the lines joining the centres of hoops 1 and 2, 3 and 4, and 5 and 6 remain parallel to the east and west boundaries, that the peg lies on the lines joining the centres of hoops 1 and 3, 2 and 4, and 5 and 6 and that the baulk-lines still terminate on a line extended through the centres of hoops 5 and 6.
    5. ACCEPTANCE OF SETTING Once players have started a game, it is deemed that they have accepted that the locations of all boundary markings, hoops and the peg are correct. Material discrepancies may be remedied under Law 55.
    6. SMALLER COURTS If the available area is too small for a standard court, a smaller court may be laid out by retaining the court proportions of five length units by four length units but using a length unit shorter than the standard 7 yards. The appropriate governing body may approve other proportions and dimensions.

PART 1
INTRODUCTION
B. THE COURT AND EQUIPMENT

3. EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES

  1. THE PEG
    1. SPECIFICATION The peg is a rigid cylinder with a height and uniform diameter above the ground of 18 inches and 1 1/2 inches respectively. It must be vertical, firmly fixed, and painted white to a height of at least 6 inches above the ground.
    2. EXTENSION The extension is ½ inch in diameter and 6 inches in length. It is designed to hold clips and to be fixed detachably to the top of the peg. The extension is not part of the peg for the purposes of Law 15 and may be temporarily removed at any time by the striker (see Law 35(c) if a ball hits the extension). When not attached to the peg the extension is an outside agency.
    3. ADJUSTMENT Subject to Law 53(a) (regulations for tournaments), at any time during the game either player is entitled to require that a leaning peg be straightened. Such a request is treated as forestalling play for the purposes of Law 23(d). Any test required for the purpose of Law 13 must be carried out before any adjustment is carried out. Following any such adjustment, the position of the balls must be adjusted if necessary to ensure that the striker gains no advantage thereby (see also Law 15(b)(6)).
  2. HOOPS
    1. SPECIFICATION Each hoop is made of solid metal and consists of two uprights connected by a crown. A hoop must be 12 inches in height above the ground measured to the top of the crown and must be vertical and firmly fixed. The uprights and the crown must have a uniform diameter of 5/8 inch above the ground although minor deviations at the top and bottom are permitted. The inner surfaces of the uprights must be approximately parallel and not less than 3 ¾ inches or more than 4 inches apart (subject to Law 53(b) for tournament and match play). Each hoop on a court must have the same dimensions within a tolerance of 1/32 inch. The crown must be straight and at right angles to the uprights.
    2. COLOURS The hoops may be left unpainted or coloured white and, in addition, the crown of the first hoop (hoop 1) is coloured blue and that of the last hoop (rover) is coloured red.
    3. ADJUSTMENT Subject to Law 53(a) (regulations for tournaments), at any time during a game the striker is entitled to require that an incorrectly aligned hoop be adjusted and that the width and height of a hoop be checked and corrected if necessary. Any test required for the purposes of Laws 13, 14 or 17 must be carried out before any adjustment or checking is carried out. Following any such adjustment, the position of the balls must be adjusted if necessary to ensure that the striker gains no advantage thereby (see also Law 14(d)(5)).
  3. BALLS
    1. SPECIFICATION There are four balls, coloured blue, black, red and yellow respectively. Alternative colours, namely green, brown, pink and white, and other sets of colours or distinguishing marks are permitted. A ball must be 3 5/8 inches in diameter and must weigh 16 ounces. The rebound and playing characteristics of each ball in a set of balls to be used in a game must comply with the requirements of Appendix 2 and must be similar to each other within the specified tolerances.
    2. TEMPORARY REMOVAL The striker is entitled at any time during the game to remove a ball between strokes in order to wipe it, avoid interference or exchange it when it is faulty or damaged. Before removal, he must mark the position of the ball accurately and consult the adversary if it is in a critical position. In addition, if the striker wishes to remove a ball immediately before attempting to peel it, he must note its rotational alignment so that the same rotational alignment will apply when the ball is replaced.
    3. KEEPING IN POSITION The striker may touch or steady a ball or apply such pressure as is reasonably necessary to make it hold its position. Grass clippings or similar material may also be used, but should be removed after use.
    4. PRESERVING ROTATIONAL ALIGNMENT If the striker wishes to remove or steady a ball immediately before attempting to peel it, he must note and preserve its rotational alignment.
  4. CLIPS
    1. SPECIFICATION There are four clips made of plastic or metal, or any other suitable material, whose colours correspond with those of the balls used in a game. They are used to indicate the score.
    2. USE At the start of each turn the hoop or peg next in order for each ball should carry a clip of the corresponding colour. When a ball scores that point the striker must remove the clip and, at the end of the turn, place it on the appropriate hoop or the peg. The clip is placed on the crown of the first 6 hoops and on an upright for the last 6. When a peg point is scored the clip is removed from the court. A clip may be temporarily removed at any time by the striker and must be removed if it is likely to influence the path of a ball in the next stroke (see Law 35(c) if a ball hits a clip). When not attached to a hoop or the peg a clip is an outside agency.
  5. MALLETS
    1. DESIGN A mallet consists of a head with a shaft firmly connected to its mid-point at right angles to it so that they function as one unit during play. If the head is detachable from the shaft, neither may be exchanged during a turn except as provided under Law 3(e)(6).
    2. SHAFT The shaft may be made of any suitable materials. A grip of any material may be attached to the shaft, but neither it nor the shaft shall be moulded with an impression of any part of the hands.
    3. HEAD The head must be rigid and may be made of any suitable materials, provided that they give no significant playing advantage over a head made entirely of wood. It must have essentially identical playing characteristics regardless of which end is used to strike the ball. Its end faces must be parallel, essentially identical and flat, though fine grooves are permitted. The edges of the faces should be of a shape or material unlikely to damage the balls and if they are bevelled they are not part of the end face.
    4. ARTIFICIAL AIDS Subject to Law 3(e)(5), no mirrors, pointers or other devices intended to assist the aiming or playing of a stroke may be attached to any part of the mallet. However, the shaft need not be straight and the head may bear sighting lines.
    5. DISABLED PLAYERS A disabled player may use a mallet with an appropriately modified shaft providing that he gains no advantage thereby compared to a player without that disability using a conventional mallet.
    6. CHANGING A MALLET A mallet may not be exchanged for another during a turn unless it suffers accidental damage which significantly affects its use. A damaged mallet may only be used if the striker gains no advantage thereby and it must be exchanged for another if it ceases to comply with these laws. The playing characteristics of a mallet may never be changed during a turn.
  6. CORNER FLAGS Flags coloured blue, red, black and yellow are optional accessories and may be placed in corners 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. They should be mounted on posts about 12 inches high that should touch the corner but must not intrude or lean into the court. A corner flag may be temporarily removed at any time by the striker.
  7. CORNER PEGS Eight white corner pegs, measuring about 3/4 inch in diameter and about 3 inches in height above the ground, are optional accessories and may be placed on the boundary one yard from each corner, measured to the further side of the corner pegs (see Diagram 2). The corner pegs should touch the boundary but must not intrude or lean into the court. A corner peg may be temporarily removed at any time by the striker.
  8. TOLERANCES All the above dimensions are subject to tolerances as listed in Appendix 1.



DIAGRAM 2 - THE CORNER SQUARE


PART 1
INTRODUCTION
C. DEFINITIONS

4. START AND END OF A GAME AND TURN

  1. WHEN A GAME STARTS A game and its first turn start when the first stroke is played (see Law 5 5(d) and Law 8(b)).
  2. WINNER A game is won by the side whose balls are first both pegged out (but see Law 53(g)(1) for time-limited games).
  3. WHEN A GAME ENDS A game ends when, in agreement as to which side has won, the players quit the court or start another game on it.
  4. WHY A TURN ENDS A turn ends if:
    1. in a stroke other than a croquet stroke, the strikerís ball does not make a roquet or score a hoop point for itself; or
    2. in a croquet stroke either ball is sent off the court as specified in Law 20(c); or
    3. in any stroke the strikerís ball or a ball roqueted in that stroke is pegged out; or
    4. the striker plays a stroke by declaring that he will leave the ball where it lies; or a stroke is deemed to be played; or
    5. the striker plays a half-bisque or bisque prematurely and the adversary fails to forestall play (but see Law 37(e)); or
    6. the striker quits the court in the mistaken belief that his turn has ended and the adversary plays a stroke; or
    7. in any stroke the striker commits an error for which the penalty is end of turn (see Laws 25, 26, 27(d) and 28); or
    8. it is so required after play is deemed not to have occurred (see Laws 30 to 32); or
    9. a ruling is made to that effect under Law 55.
  5. WHEN A TURN ENDS A turn ends and, unless the game has been won, a new turn starts with the adversary as striker when:
    1. one of the conditions in Law 4(d) has been met, the last stroke of the turn has ended and the balls and clips are correctly positioned; or
    2. the adversary plays a stroke after the striker has either:
      1. quitted the court in the belief that the requirements of Law 4(e)(1) have been met; or
      2. permitted the adversary to play a stroke.

      (but see Law 37 for handicap play and Law 53(g)(4) for time-limited games).


PART 1
INTRODUCTION
C. DEFINITIONS

5. A STROKE AND THE STRIKING PERIOD

  1. A STROKE A stroke is the striker's attempt to hit a ball in play with a mallet as part of his turn, or declaration that he will leave the ball where it lies. A stroke includes any resulting movement of balls in play.
  2. THE STRIKING PERIOD The striking period is the period during which a fault under Law 28(a) can be committed.
  3. WHEN A STROKE MAY BE PLAYED A stroke must not be commenced until the preceding stroke has ended if that could affect the outcome of either stroke.
  4. WHEN A STROKE AND THE STRIKING PERIOD START A stroke and the striking period start when the mallet head has passed or leaves the ball on the final backswing that the striker intends to make before striking the ball. If no backswing is used, the stroke and the striking period start when the forward swing starts.
  5. WHEN A STROKE IS PLAYED
    1. If, having started a stroke, the striker stops or diverts the mallet in a successful attempt to avoid hitting the ball or committing a fault, the stroke is annulled and the striker may start another one.
    2. Otherwise, the stroke is played when
      1. the mallet hits the ball; or
      2. a fault is committed; or
      3. the mallet misses or does not reach the ball.
  6. WHEN THE STRIKING PERIOD ENDS The striking period ends when the striker quits his stance under control. If the striker does not quit his stance before playing the next stroke the striking period ends when the next stroke starts.
  7. WHEN A STROKE ENDS A stroke ends when every ball moved in consequence thereof has come to rest, has left the court or has been moved, picked up or arrested under Laws 15(c) or 18(a)(2).
  8. OTHER CONTACT BETWEEN MALLET AND BALL If the striker accidentally hits a ball before a stroke has started, the ball is replaced and the striker continues his turn. A mallet may be used to reposition balls between strokes.
  1. A STROKE A stroke is a movement of the mallet made by the striker with the intention of hitting a ball for the purpose of playing a stroke and any consequences thereof. A stroke must not be commenced until the preceding stroke has ended if the outcome of either stroke could be affected thereby (see Law 33 for interference with a moving ball).
  2. THE STRIKING PERIOD The striking period is the period during which a fault under Law 28(a) can be committed.
  3. WHEN A STROKE AND THE STRIKING PERIOD START A stroke and the striking period start when the mallet head has passed or leaves the ball on the final backswing that the striker intends to make before striking the ball. If no backswing is used, the stroke and the striking period start when the forward swing starts.
  4. WHEN A STROKE IS PLAYED After a stroke has started, the stroke is played when:
    1. there is any contact between mallet and ball; or
    2. the striker accidentally misses the ball; or
    3. a fault is committed.
  5. DELIBERATELY INTERRUPTING THE SWING If the striker deliberately interrupts the swing after the stroke has started but before it has been played, and the mallet does not touch a ball, the stroke and the striking period are deemed not to have started and the striker may start the stroke and the striking period again.
  6. WHEN A STROKE IS DEEMED TO BE PLAYED A stroke is deemed to be played and the turn ends if the striker announces his intention to leave his ball where it lies or deliberately misses the ball otherwise than for the purpose of deliberately interrupting the swing under Law 5(e). If the striker plays neither of his balls during a turn, he must state which of his balls is deemed to have been played so that he is then responsible for the position of that ball.
  7. ACCIDENTAL CONTACT If the striker accidentally hits a ball before a stroke has started, the ball is replaced and the striker continues his turn (see Law 33(a)).
  8. WHEN THE STRIKING PERIOD ENDS The striking period ends when the striker quits his stance under control, except that faults under Laws 28(a)(1), (2) and (3) are not committed if the touching or resting occurs after the striker has completed the swing in which he played the stroke. If the striker does not quit his stance before playing the next stroke, the striking period ends when the earlier stroke ends or, if sooner, when the next stroke starts.
  9. WHEN A STROKE ENDS A stroke ends when every ball moved in consequence thereof has come to rest, has left the court or has been moved, picked up or arrested under Law 15(c) or Law 18(a)(2).

PART 1
INTRODUCTION
C. DEFINITIONS

6. STATES OF A BALL

  1. BALL IN PLAY  A ball becomes a ball in play when placed on the court prior to being played into the game under Law 8(b). Except while it is a ball in hand, it continues to be a ball in play until the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out.
    A ball in play is one which may influence the game. A ball becomes a ball in play when it is played into the game under Law 8(b) or Law 26(a)(2). Except while it is a ball in hand, it continues to be a ball in play until the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out.
  2. BALL AT REST
    1. A ball at rest is a ball in play that is occupying a stationary position on the court.
    2. A ball becomes a ball at rest when:
      1. having been caused to move as a consequence of a stroke, it is deemed to have come to rest and has not become a ball in hand; or
      2. having been a ball in hand, it is placed replaced on the court.
    3. A ball ceases to be a ball at rest when it is caused to move as a consequence of a stroke or becomes a ball in hand.
    4. Subject to Law 6(b)(5), a ball is deemed to have come to rest when it appears to have stopped moving.
    5. A ball in a critical position is deemed to have come to rest only when its position has apparently remained unchanged for at least 5 seconds. If, in addition, its position needs to be tested (see Law 48(c)(4)), it is deemed to have come to rest only when its position has been agreed or adjudicated upon.
  3. BALL IN HAND
    1. Any ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency:
      1. when it is temporarily removed under Law 3(c)(2); or
      2. when it leaves the court; or
      3. when it is moved under Law 19; or
      4. when it must be replaced in order to rectify an error or correct an interference.
    2. The striker's ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency:
      1. when it is moved under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)); or
      2. when a roquet is deemed to have been made; or
      3. when it is moved, picked up or arrested under Law 15(c) or Law 18(a)(2); or
      4. at the end of a stroke in which it makes a roquet; or
      5. at the end of the last stroke of a turn if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.
    3. A ball other than the strikerís ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency at the end of a stroke if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.
    4. A ball ceases to be a ball in hand and an outside agency and becomes a ball at rest when it is placed in a lawful position on the court or, if left on the court in a misplaced position, at the start of the next stroke. However, if there is a choice of positions, the striker may return it to hand and relocate it at any time until the earlier of the start of his next stroke or the end of his turn.
      A ball ceases to be a ball in hand and an outside agency when it is replaced on the court and thereby becomes a ball at rest. However, if the striker has a choice of placement or replacement positions, he remains entitled to relocate it, thereby causing it to become a ball in hand again, at any time until the earlier of the start of his next stroke or the end of his turn.
  4. BALL IN A CRITICAL POSITION A ball is in a critical position if a minor change to its current position could materially affect future play. Examples may include positions in or near hoops, wired positions and positions on or near the yard-line or boundary. The striker must consult the adversary before moving or wiping such a ball.
  5. LIVE AND DEAD BALLS
    1. A ball other than the strikerís ball is defined as being live or dead for the sole purpose of determining whether or not it may be roqueted and have croquet taken from it.
    2. LIVE BALL Any such ball is live at the start of a turn and becomes so again each time the strikerís ball scores a hoop point for itself.
    3. DEAD BALL A ball becomes dead when croquet has been taken from it and remains dead until it becomes live again. The strikerís ball may not take croquet from a dead ball. If the strikerís ball hits a dead ball, it does not constitute a roquet.
  6. YARD-LINE AND CORNER BALLS A ball at rest on a yard-line is known as a yard-line ball. A ball replaced on the yard-line is known as a yard-line ball. A ball replaced on a corner spot is also known as a corner ball.
  7. ROVER BALL A rover ball is one which has scored all 12 of its hoop points (but see Law 44(d) for shortened games).
  8. GROUPS OF BALLS A 3-ball group is formed by one ball being in contact with two other balls. A 4-ball group is formed by a fourth ball being in contact with a 3-ball group.
    GROUPS OF BALLS
    A 3-ball group is formed by one ball being in contact with two other balls provided that if this occurs:
    1. at the start of a turn, any of the three balls is a yard-line ball; and
    2. during a turn, either of the two balls other than the strikerís ball is a yard-line ball.
    A 4-ball group is formed by the fourth ball being in contact with a 3-ball group.
  9. BALL CLEAR OF A HOOP A ball is clear of a hoop if no part of it lies within the jaws of the hoop.

PART 1
INTRODUCTION
C. DEFINITIONS

7. OUTSIDE AGENCIES

  1. DEFINITION Subject to Law 7(b), an outside agency is any agency unconnected with the game. Examples include animals, spectators, a referee other than the players, the players or equipment from another game, a ball in hand, a ball not in play, a clip not attached to a hoop or the peg, the peg extension when not attached to the peg and other stray objects.
  2. EXCLUSIONS Neither weather nor, except in exceptional circumstances dealt with under Law 55, loose impediments are outside agencies.
  3. INTERFERENCE An outside agency should be moved or removed if it might affect play (see also Law 33(a) 33(b) (interference by an outside agency) and Law 34(b) (fixed obstacles)).

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

8. THE START OF A GAME

  1. THE TOSS The winner of the toss decides whether he will take the choice of lead, which includes the right to play second, or the choice of balls. This is known as the right of choice. If he takes the choice of lead his adversary has the choice of balls and vice versa. When a match consists of more than one game, the right of choice alternates after the first game. Once made a choice may not be revoked (but see Law 26(c)).
  2. THE START At the start of a game, the player entitled to play first places one of his balls on any point on either baulk-line and plays the first stroke of his turn. At the end of that turn the adversary plays one of his balls into the game from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line. This includes taking croquet from a ball in play that is either on or near a baulk-line so that a ball may be placed on a baulk-line in contact with it. In the third and fourth turns the remaining two balls are played into the game in the same way as the second ball (but see Law 36(d) for advanced play, Law 37(c)(2) for handicap play and Law 26(b) if the correct ball cannot be played).

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

9. ELECTION OF STRIKER'S BALL

  1. RIGHT TO PLAY EITHER BALL After all four balls have been played into the game under Law 8(b), the striker may elect at the start of any turn to play that turn with either of his balls (but see Law 37(a) for handicap play).
  2. HOW ELECTION IS MADE The election is made by:
    1. lifting a ball that is not in contact with another ball, in accordance with Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)); or
    2. playing a stroke.
    In each case the ball so elected becomes the striker's ball for that turn and the striker must not then strike the partner ball. If he does so, Law 26 applies.
  3. LIFTING A BALL A player lifts a ball by deliberately moving it from its position in a manner other than that used for playing a stroke.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

10. BALL OFF THE COURT

A ball leaves the court as soon as any part of it would touch a straight edge raised vertically from the boundary. It then becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency. The striker must consult the adversary before testing whether or not a ball is off the court if the position is critical.


PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

11. BALL IN THE YARD-LINE AREA

  1. BALLS OTHER THAN THE STRIKERíS BALL At the end of each stroke any ball in the yard-line area, other than the striker's ball, becomes a ball in hand.
  2. THE STRIKERíS BALL If the striker's ball is in the yard-line area at the end of a stroke it is played from where it lies unless the striker is entitled to take croquet. Only at the end of the last stroke of a turn does the striker's ball in the yard-line area become a ball in hand.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

12. REPLACEMENT PLACEMENT OF A BALL OFF THE COURT OR IN THE YARD-LINE AREA

  1. ABSENCE OF OTHER BALLS Before the next stroke, subject to Law 12(c) and Law 19:
    1. any ball in hand that has left the court must be placed replaced on the yard-line at the point nearest to where it left the court; and
    2. any ball in hand in the yard-line area must be placed replaced on the yard-line at the point nearest to where it came to rest.
  2. PRESENCE OF OTHER BALLS If a ball cannot be placed replaced in accordance with Law 12(a) because of the presence of:
    1. the striker's ball inside the yard-line area; or
    2. one or more yard-line balls; or
    3. one or more balls outside the yard-line area,
    it must be placed replaced on the yard-line as the striker chooses in contact with any ball that directly or indirectly interferes with its replacement.
  3. INTERFERENCE BY THE STRIKERíS BALL If the striker is entitled to take croquet, the striker's ball is a ball in hand and an outside agency until it is placed for the croquet stroke and must not interfere with the placement replacement of a ball under Laws 12(a) or 12(b).
  4. ORDER OF PLACEMENT REPLACEMENT If two or more balls have to be placed replaced, the order of placement replacement is as the striker chooses.
  5. HOW TO PLACE REPLACE The striker must place replace balls on the yard-line with his back to the court unless he has a choice of placement replacement positions under Law 12(b) and must take special care to ensure that such placement replacement is accurate. He must consult the adversary if he is in any doubt whether a ball may have to be placed replaced in contact with another ball.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

13. WIRING LIFT

  1. LIFT If the adversary is responsible for the position of a ball of the strikerís side which is wired from all other balls and not in contact with another ball, the striker may start his turn:
    1. by playing as the balls lie; or
    2. by lifting the wired ball and playing it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line or taking croquet from a ball that it could touch in such a position.
  2. RESPONSIBILITY FOR POSITION
    1. A player becomes or remains responsible for the position of any ball that:
      1. he plays; or
      2. is moved or shaken as a result of his play; or
      3. is involved in any croquet stroke or cannon that he plays, even if it does not move; or
      4. is replaced when an error committed by him is rectified; or
      5. belongs to him, in the event that he played the first stroke of a turn with an adversary's ball,or by declaring that he was leaving a ball where it lay without specifying which.
    2. However, a player does not become responsible for the position of any ball replaced to correct an interference.
    1. Subject to Law 13(b)(2), a player becomes responsible for the position of any ball:
      1. that he is deemed to have played; or
      2. that he is deemed to have roqueted; or
      3. that is moved or shaken or becomes a ball in hand as a consequence of his play, including a ball replaced after rectification of an error committed by him under Laws 25 to 28.
    2. A player is not responsible for the position of any ball replaced following:
      1. >an interference committed by him under Laws 30 to 32; or
      2. an interference, other than one committed by him, under Law 33; or
      3. an interference under Law 34
    3. unless he was so responsible before the interference occurred or became so responsible thereafter.
  3. WHEN WIRED A ball ("the relevant ball") is wired from another ball ("the target ball") if:
    1. any part of a hoop, including the jaws, or the peg would impede the direct course of any part of the relevant ball towards any part of the target ball; or
    2. any part of a hoop, excluding the jaws, or the peg would impede the swing of the mallet before its impact with the relevant ball; or
    3. any part of the relevant ball lies within the jaws of a hoop.
  4. IMPEDED SWING In Law 13(c)(2), the swing is impeded if there is any part of an end face of the mallet that the striker used in the turn before the relevant ball was positioned with which he would be unable to strike the centre of the relevant ball in order to drive it freely with his normal swing towards any part of the target ball. However, the swing is not impeded merely because a hoop or the peg interferes with the striker's stance.
  5. TESTING
    1. A player may ask a referee to conduct a wiring test only if he is the striker entitled to claim a lift with the relevant ball before the first stroke of the current turn. He must otherwise rely on an unaided ocular test to determine whether or not one ball is wired from another.
    2. The striker is entitled to the benefit of any doubt in an adjudication of whether one ball is wired from another.
  6. CHANGE OF DECISION If the striker lifts a ball of his side under Law 13(a)(2):
    1. it is thereby elected as the strikerís ball and he may not then play with the other ball of his side. If he does so, Law 26 applies. In addition, he is obliged to take the lift to which he is entitled and he may not then play the lifted ball from where it lay before it was lifted unless it already lay on a baulk-line.
    2. and places it on an unoccupied point on either baulk-line, whether in contact with another ball or not, he remains entitled to play it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line until he plays a stroke.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

14. HOOP POINT

  1. DEFINITIONS
    1. A ball scores a hoop point by passing through its next hoop in the order and direction shown in Diagram 1 as a consequence of one or more strokes. This is also known as running a hoop in order.
    2. The playing and non-playing sides of the hoop are defined relative to this direction, as shown in Diagram 3.
    3. The planes of the playing and non-playing sides are the surfaces constructed by raising a horizontal straight line against the relevant sides of the hoop uprights from the ground to the crown of the hoop.
    4. The jaws of a hoop are defined as the space enclosed by the inner surfaces of the uprights and the planes of the playing and non-playing sides.
  2. STARTING TO RUN Subject to Law 14(d)(1) to (3), a ball starts to run a hoop when it first breaks the plane of the non-playing side when travelling from the playing side to the non-playing side. However, if the ball subsequently moves back out of the hoop during the stroke and either:
    1. comes to rest in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side; or
    2. exits the hoop entirely on the playing side
    then it is deemed that it has not started to run the hoop.
  3. COMPLETING THE RUNNING Subject to Law 14(d)(4), a ball completes running a hoop when it clears the plane of the playing side while traveling forward through the hoop, providing that it comes to rest on the non-playing side clear of that plane.
    Subject to Law 14(d)(4), a ball completes the running as soon as it no longer breaks the plane of the playing side when travelling from the playing side to the non-playing side. However, if the ball subsequently moves back into the hoop during the stroke and either:
    1. comes to rest in the jaws where it breaks the plane of the playing side; or
    2. exits the hoop entirely on the playing side
    then it is deemed that it has not completed the running of the hoop.
  4. SPECIAL SITUATIONS
    1. If a ball makes a roquet under Law 16(b) before it starts to run its hoop in order, it cannot thereafter score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke.
    2. If a ball first enters its hoop in order from the non-playing side, it cannot score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke. Having so entered, it must come to rest in a position entirely clear of the hoop or in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side before it can score the hoop point in a subsequent stroke.
    3. If a ball in hand is placed for a croquet stroke within the jaws of its hoop in order where it breaks the plane of the non-playing side, and the stroke is played from that position:
      1. it has not started to run the hoop; and
      2. it may not do so until it is clear of that plane at the start of a subsequent stroke.

      If a croquet stroke is played with the strikerís ball placed within the jaws of its hoop in order in a position where it breaks the plane of the non-playing side, it cannot score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke. Having been so placed, it must come to rest in a position entirely clear of the hoop or in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side before it can score the hoop point in a subsequent stroke.

    4. A ball may complete running its hoop in order in the stroke in which it started to run the hoop. Alternatively, it may complete running the hoop in a subsequent stroke or turn unless it either:
      1. becomes a ball in hand in preparation for a croquet stroke; or
      2. is lifted under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)) in which case it must start to run the hoop again.
    5. A ball may complete the running of a hoop in two or more strokes or turns. However, if the strikerís ball has not completed the running and it either:

      1. becomes a ball in hand in preparation for a croquet stroke; or
      2. is lifted under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)) it must start to run the hoop again.
    6. A ball at rest cannot score or lose a hoop point solely as a result of a hoop being moved or straightened.
  5. PEELING If a ball other than the striker's ball scores a hoop point as a consequence of a stroke, it is said to be peeled through the hoop.

DIAGRAM 3 - RUNNING A HOOP

When a hoop is run. a) the ball has not started running the hoop. b) the ball has started running the hoop. c) the ball has not completed running the hoop, and d) the ball has finished running the hoop.
PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

15. PEG POINT

  1. HOW A PEG POINT IS SCORED Subject to Law 15(b), if the strikerís ball is a rover ball:
    1. it scores a peg point for itself, and is then said to be pegged out, by hitting the peg as a consequence of a stroke (but see Law 38 in handicap play); and
    2. it may cause another rover ball to be pegged out by causing it to hit the peg as a consequence of a stroke.
  2. SPECIAL SITUATIONS
    1. If the strikerís ball makes a roquet under Law 16(b), it cannot thereafter score a peg point for itself in the same stroke.
    2. If the striker's ball simultaneously hits a live ball and the peg in order, it is pegged out unless the striker claims a roquet by taking croquet.
    3. If, at the start of a turn, the striker plays a rover that is in contact with the peg, that ball is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.
    4. If the striker's ball is a rover and hits, or causes another ball to hit, another rover that is in contact with the peg, that other rover is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.
    5. If the strikerís ball, being a rover, and another rover ball that it causes to hit the peg do so simultaneously, they are deemed to be pegged out in the order nominated by the striker.
    6. A ball at rest cannot be pegged out solely as a result of the peg being moved or straightened.
  3. BALL REMAINING IN PLAY A ball remains in play throughout the stroke in which it is pegged out and may cause other balls to move and score hoop or peg points. It may only be moved, picked up or arrested in its course if the state of the game will not be affected thereby.
  4. REMOVAL FROM COURT A ball ceases to be a ball in play and becomes an outside agency at the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out. The striker must remove a pegged out ball and the corresponding clip from the court before the next stroke. However, if he is about to peg out the strikerís ball in the next stroke and the pegged out ball is unlikely to interfere, he may delay doing so until after the next stroke. If the pegged out ball is left in play thereafter, Law 30 applies.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

16. ROQUET

  1. BALLS THAT MAY BE ROQUETED A roquet may be made by the striker's ball on any live ball unless the striker is already required to take croquet. However, a roquet may be made by the strikerís ball on a live ball during a croquet stroke (but see Law 17(b)(3)).
  2. WHEN A ROQUET IS ACTUALLY MADE A roquet is actually made when the strikerís ball hits a live ball, which includes any contact between the balls as a consequence of a stroke. However:
    1. if two or more live balls are hit in one stroke, a roquet is made only on the ball first hit;
    2. if two or more live balls are hit simultaneously, a roquet is made only on the ball that the striker nominates by taking croquet from it;
    3. if the striker's ball simultaneously hits a live ball and the peg in order, Law 15(b)(2) applies.
  3. WHEN A ROQUET IS DEEMED TO HAVE BEEN MADE Unless the striker is already required to take croquet, a roquet is deemed to have been made if the striker is required, or is entitled and so elects, to play a stroke in which his ball starts in contact with a live ball.
    A roquet is deemed to have been made:
    1. if the striker plays the first stroke of a turn by taking croquet from a ball with a ball of his side that:
      1. is already in contact with it; or
      2. is placed in contact with it under Law 8(b) (start of game) or Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)).
    2. during a turn that the striker, not having made a roquet in the preceding stroke, is otherwise entitled to continue, if the strikerís ball:
      1. is on or near a yard-line and a live ball is replaced on the yard-line in contact with it; or
      2. leaves the court after scoring a hoop point for itself and is replaced on the yard-line in contact with a live ball; or
      3. scores a hoop point for itself and comes to rest in contact with a ball on which it is not permitted to make an actual roquet in accordance with Laws 17(b)(2) or 17(b)(3).
  4. GROUP OF BALLS. If a roquet may be deemed to have been made on a ball that forms part of a group of balls, a roquet may be deemed to have been made on any live ball in the group and is deemed to have been made only on the ball that the striker nominates by taking croquet from it (see Law 19(c) for election of balls).

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

17. HOOP AND ROQUET SITUATIONS

  1. HOOP AND ROQUET If, during a stroke, the striker's ball both completes running a hoop in order (see Law 14(c)) and hits a ball that, at the start of the stroke, was clear of the hoop on the nonplaying side, the following applies:
    1. The hoop point is scored by the striker's ball and the other balls become live before the impact; and so
    2. a roquet is also made, subject to Laws 16(b)(1) to (3).
      This applies no matter whether the ball was live before the stroke, and regardless of the actual order of events.

      If, during a stroke, the strikerís ball:
    1. completes the running of a hoop in order and then hits a ball that, at the start of the stroke, was clear of the hoop on the non-playing side, the strikerís ball scores a hoop point for itself and then makes a roquet under Law 16(b); or
    2. hits a ball that, at the start of the stroke, was clear of a hoop on the non-playing side, and then completes the running of the hoop in order, it is deemed that the contact occurs after the strikerís ball scores the hoop point for itself so that it then makes a roquet under Law 16(b).
  2. OTHER CASES If, during a stroke and before or after completing the running of a hoop in order, the strikerís ball hits a ball (ďthe relevant ballĒ) that, at the start of the stroke, was:
    1. live and not clear of the hoop on the non-playing side, a roquet is made on the relevant ball under Law 16(b) and the hoop point is deemed not to be scored for the strikerís ball; or
    2. dead and not clear of the hoop on the non-playing side, the hoop point is scored but, subject to Law 17(c), a roquet is deemed not to be made on the relevant ball; or
    3. in contact with the strikerís ball, the hoop point is scored but, subject to Law 17(c), a roquet is deemed not to be made on the relevant ball.
  3. BALLS COMING TO REST IN CONTACT In Laws 17(b)(2) and 17(b)(3), if the strikerís ball comes to rest in contact with the relevant ball, a roquet is deemed to have been made on the relevant ball under Law 16(c)(2)(C).

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

18. CONSEQUENCES OF A ROQUET

  1. WHEN A ROQUET IS ACTUALLY MADE If the striker's ball makes a roquet under Law 16(b):
    1. subject to Law 17(a), it cannot thereafter score a hoop point or peg point for itself in the same stroke;
    2. it remains a ball in play throughout the stroke and may therefore cause other balls to score hoop or peg points; accordingly, it may only be moved, picked up or arrested in its course if the state of the game will not be affected thereby;
    3. it becomes a ball in hand at the end of the stroke unless the strikerís turn has ended (see Law 4(d)); and
    4. the striker takes croquet under Laws 19 and 20 unless the turn so ends.
  2. WHEN A ROQUET IS DEEMED TO HAVE BEEN MADE If a roquet is deemed to have been made under Law 16(c), the strikerís ball becomes a ball in hand and the striker takes croquet under Laws 19 and 20.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

19. PLACING BALLS FOR A CROQUET STROKE

  1. BALL PLACEMENT Subject to Law 19(d), in preparation for a croquet stroke, the striker must place the striker's ball on the ground in contact with the roqueted ball however he chooses but not in contact with any other ball. Subject to Law 19(b), no other ball may be moved.
  2. CANNONS If, after any necessary application of Law 12, the roqueted ball forms part of a group of balls, or would do so if the striker's ball was placed in accordance with Law 19(a), the croquet stroke is known as a cannon. In preparation for the stroke, all balls other than the roqueted ball become balls in hand and are temporarily removed. The roqueted ball must be replaced in its original position if it has been moved and the other balls are then placed replaced as follows:
    1. 3-BALL CANNON The striker must place the striker's ball and the third ball on the ground in contact with the roqueted ball however he chooses provided that the striker's ball is not in contact with the third ball.
    2. 4-BALL CANNON The striker must place the striker's ball and one of the remaining balls as in Law 19(b)(1) and must then place the fourth ball on the ground not in contact with the striker's ball but in contact with one or both of the other two balls.
    The striker remains entitled to reposition the balls.
  3. ELECTION OF BALLS If the striker moves a ball or balls in preparation for a croquet stroke, no election of the roqueted ball or, unless Law 9(b)(1) applies, the strikerís ball is thereby made until the stroke is played.
  4. FIRST STROKE OF A TURN In respect of the first stroke of a turn, the references in Laws 19(a) and 19(b) to the striker's ball shall include any ball of the striker's side which was in play at the end of the preceding turn and the references to the roqueted ball shall include any ball from which croquet may lawfully be taken.
  5. CHANGE OF DECISION The striker remains entitled to reposition balls under Laws 19(a) or 19(b) until he plays a stroke.
  6. KEEPING BALLS IN POSITION When preparing for a croquet stroke, the striker may touch or steady the roqueted ball or apply such pressure to any ball by hand or foot, but not by mallet, as is reasonably necessary to make it hold its position, provided that neither its original position nor, if a peel is to be attempted, its rotational alignment is finally disturbed. If necessary, the balls may be held in position by grass clippings or similar material.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

20. CROQUET STROKE

  1. TERMS In a croquet stroke the roqueted ball is known as the croqueted ball and the striker's ball is said to take croquet from it. In playing the stroke the striker is said to take croquet.
  2. HOW PLAYED The striker plays a stroke with the balls placed in accordance with Law 19 and in so doing must play into the croqueted ball and move or shake it (see Law 28(a)(14)).
  3. BALL OFF COURT In a croquet stroke the striker's turn ends if he sends off the court:
    1. the croqueted ball, unless it is pegged out in the stroke; or
    2. the striker's ball, unless it makes a roquet or scores a hoop point for itself in the stroke.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

21. CONTINUATION STROKE

  1. ENTITLEMENT After the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself or after a croquet stroke the striker becomes entitled to play a continuation stroke unless he is entitled to take croquet immediately or his turn has ended.
  2. REQUIREMENT TO TAKE CROQUET IMMEDIATELY If the strikerís ball:
    1. scores a hoop point for itself and then makes a roquet in the same stroke; or
    2. makes a roquet in a croquet stroke
    then, unless the strikerís turn has ended, there is no continuation stroke and the next stroke must be a croquet stroke.
  3. NON-CUMULATIVE Continuation strokes may not be accumulated. Accordingly, if the strikerís ball scores:
    1. two hoop points for itself in the same stroke; or
    2. a hoop point for itself in a croquet stroke,
    then, unless the strikerís turn has ended, he is entitled to play only one continuation stroke.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

22. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

  1. DEFINITIONS
    1. Errors are mistakes in play which are dealt with under Laws 25 to 28 (but see Law 39(a) for restoration of bisques in handicap play).
    2. Strokes in error include the stroke in which an error is committed and any subsequent stroke played before the earlier of the discovery of the error or the limit of claims.
    3. An error is said to be discovered when the striker announces it or the adversary forestalls play in respect of it. References to discovery before a stroke mean before the stroke is played.
  2. DELIBERATE ERRORS A player must not deliberately commit an error.
  3. STRIKER MUST DECLARE The striker must immediately declare any error he commits or suspects he may have committed and cease play until the matter is resolved.
  4. RECTIFICATION
    1. An error is rectified by cancelling all points scored for any ball in any stroke in error and replacing the balls in their lawful positions at the start of the first stroke in error. If a ball could have occupied more than one lawful position at that time, it may be replaced in any such position as the striker chooses. However, if a ball is placed replaced following rectification of a fault, it must be replaced in the position it occupied before the stroke was played.
    2. If the strikerís turn continues after rectification, each ball is then live if and only if it was live at the start of the first stroke in error.
  5. LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is the end of the period within which an error must be discovered if it is to be rectified. If the end of a turn prevents a limit of claims being reached, the limit becomes the first stroke of the next turn. The ultimate limit of claims is the end of the game. If the specified limit of claims is not reached because a turn or the game ends, it is deemed to be before the first stroke of the adversaryís next turn or the end of the game respectively. Strokes in error are counted when determining whether the limit of claims of any other error has passed.
  6. AFTER LIMIT OF CLAIMS
    1. Subject to Laws 22(f)(2) and 40(d) (doubles play), if an error is discovered after its limit of claims it is not rectified, the balls are not replaced and all points in order scored for any ball in any stroke in error are counted. Additional consequences for certain errors are set out in the relevant sub-law (see Laws 27(e) to 27(h)).
    2. No peg point may be scored by the striker for any ball when playing a wrong ball. Any peg point apparently so scored must be cancelled if discovered at any time before the end of the game and Law 30 applies.
  7. ERRORS AND INTERFERENCES If an interference under Laws 30 to 35 or 31 is discovered within the limit of claims of an earlier error, the error is dealt with first

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

23. FORESTALLING PLAY

  1. DEFINITION A player forestalls play when, in order to discharge his duty as a referee of the game, he issues a request to the striker that play cease in a manner capable of conveying the request to a striker with normal hearing.
  2. ADVERSARY MUST NOT FORESTALL Unless an error under Laws 25, 26, 27(d) or 28 has already occurred, the adversary must not forestall play or warn the striker if he suspects or becomes aware that the striker is about to:
    1. run a wrong hoop; or
    2. play a wrong ball; or
    3. purport to take croquet from a dead ball.
  3. ADVERSARY MUST FORESTALL Subject to Laws 23(b) and 23(d), a player must forestall play immediately if he suspects or becomes aware that:
    1. the striker intends to play a questionable stroke without having it specially watched; or
    2. an error, other than a fault, or an interference is about to occur; or
    3. an error or an interference has occurred; or
    4. the strikerís turn is about to end prematurely (see Law 35(a) and, for handicap play, Law 37(e)); or
    5. a clip is misplaced; or
    6. a boundary marking has been displaced.
  4. WHEN TO FORESTALL The adversary should forestall play between strokes and, unless the issue concerns the stroke about to be played, must not forestall play after a stroke has started and before it has been played. If he does so, Law 34(a) applies.
  5. STRIKER CONTINUING TO PLAY If the striker continues to play after being forestalled and before the issue is settled, Law 32 applies.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

24. COMPOUND ERRORS

  1. GENERAL
    Subject to Law 24(b), if the striker commits:
    1. more than one error in the same stroke, it is deemed that only the first of the applicable laws in Laws 25 to 28 applies; or
    2. one or more errors before the limit of claims of an earlier error, only the law applicable to the earlier error applies
  2. ERROR DISCOVERED AFTER THE LIMIT OF CLAIMS
    An error which is discovered after its limit of claims shall not be considered a component of a compound error.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

25. PLAYING WHEN NOT ENTITLED TO DO SO

  1. GENERAL If a player plays one or more strokes when not entitled to do so and the error is discovered before the limit of claims:
    1. any points scored in the first such stroke and any subsequent strokes played by the offending side are cancelled;
    2. any balls moved by those strokes are replaced, unless they have subsequently been moved by strokes which the non-offending side was entitled to play;
    3. the side entitled to play then plays.
  2. LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is the first stroke of the next turn to be started by the non-offending side.
  1. STRIKER If the striker plays a stroke when not entitled to play and the error is discovered before the first stroke of the adversary's next turn, the error is rectified and the turn ends.
  2. ADVERSARY If the adversary starts his turn prematurely (see Law 4(e)) and the error is discovered before the end of the strikerís turn, the error is rectified and the adversary restarts his turn correctly after the strikerís turn has ended.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

26. PLAYING A WRONG BALL

  1. GENERAL
    1. Subject to Law 26(c), if the striker plays a wrong ball and the error is discovered before the first stroke of the next turn (but see Law 37(c)(3) for handicap play) to be started by playing a correct ball, the error is rectified and the turn ends.
    2. If the error is rectified and was committed in the first stroke of one of the first four turns of the game, the correct ball is placed on any unoccupied point on either baulk-line as the striker chooses. That ball becomes a ball in play and the turn ends. and the striker is deemed to have played a stroke with that ball.
    3. A ball wrongly played into the game becomes a ball in play only if the error is not rectified.
  2. PLAYER UNABLE TO PLAY CORRECT BALL The game is restarted if the player of the fourth turn of the game discovers, either before or after he plays a stroke, that both his balls have been played into the game in the first two turns of the game.
  3. EXCHANGE OF COLOURS If it is discovered after the first stroke of the fifth turn of the game that both players have played a wrong ball in the first stroke of every earlier turn of the game, the choice of balls under Law 8(a) is reversed and play is deemed to have proceeded from the start of the game accordingly.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

27. PLAYING WHEN A BALL IS MISPLACED

  1. GENERAL
    1. Between strokes, any misplaced balls must be placed in a lawful position, at the striker's choice if more than one is available. Subject to Law 23(b), if the adversary observes that the striker is about to play a stroke when any ball is misplaced, he must forestall play.
    2. If a stroke is played with a ball misplaced, the first of the relevant Laws 27(d) to 27(i) applies.
    3. A misplaced ball remains so until it is placed in a lawful position or moved by a stroke.

  2. Subject to Law 23(b), if the adversary observes that the striker is about to play a stroke when any ball is misplaced, he must forestall play so that the ball may be properly placed. If the error is not discovered until after the stroke is played, it is dealt with, subject to Laws 27(b) and 33, by the first of the applicable Laws 27(d) to 27(i).
  3. MINOR MISPLACEMENT
    For the purposes of these Laws other than Law 28(a)(8):
    1. a ball is deemed to be in contact with another ball when a stroke is played even if it is physically not in contact at that time if, in preparation for the stroke, the striker attempted finally to place, adjust or leave the balls in contact; and
    2. a ball is deemed not to be in contact with another ball when a stroke is played even if it is physically in contact at that time if, in preparation for the stroke, the striker attempted finally to place, adjust or leave the balls out of contact.
  4. PURPORTING TO TAKE CROQUET
    1. Subject to Law 27(c)(2), the striker purports to take croquet if:
      1. he plays a stroke after finally placing or adjusting one or more balls so that the striker's ball is in contact with a ball from which it may not lawfully take croquet; or
      2. being required to take croquet, he plays a stroke after leaving the striker's ball in contact with a ball from which it may not lawfully take croquet.
    2. Temporarily removing and replacing a ball under Law 3(c)(2) or replacing a ball after interference under Laws 33 or 34 does not of itself constitute placing or adjusting it.
    3. Purporting to take croquet from a live ball has the same consequences as taking croquet from that ball, except that Law 27(e) applies.
  5. PURPORTING TO TAKE CROQUET FROM DEAD BALL
    If the striker purports to take croquet from a dead ball and the error is discovered before the first stroke of the adversary's next turn, the error is rectified and the turn ends.
  6. PURPORTING TO TAKE CROQUET FROM LIVE BALL If the striker purports to take croquet from a live ball and the error is discovered before two further strokes of that turn, the error is rectified. The striker remains entitled to play unless his turn ended under Law 4(d) during a stroke in error.
    1. If the striker purports to take croquet from a live ball and the error is discovered before two further strokes of the striker's turn, the error is rectified and, subject to Law 27(j), the striker continues his turn correctly.
    2. IIf the error is discovered after the limit of claims, play is deemed to have proceeded as if, immediately before the first stroke in error, a roquet had been made only on the ball that was in contact with the striker's ball.
  7. FAILING TO TAKE CROQUET WHEN REQUIRED TO DO SO  If the striker, being required to take croquet, plays a stroke in which he neither takes croquet nor purports to do so and the error is discovered before two further strokes of that turn, the error is rectified. The striker remains entitled to play unless his turn ended under Law 4(d) during a stroke in error.
    1. If the striker, being required to take croquet, plays a stroke in which he neither takes croquet nor purports to take croquet and the error is discovered before two further strokes of the striker's turn, the error is rectified and, subject to Law 27(j), the striker continues his turn correctly.
    2. If the error is discovered after the limit of claims, play is deemed to have proceeded as if, immediately before the first stroke in error, a roquet had been neither made nor deemed to have been made, but that the striker had remained entitled to play the first stroke in error.
  8. FAILING TO PLAY A BALL FROM BAULK
    1. If the striker, being required to play a ball from a baulk-line in accordance with Laws 8(b) (start of game) or 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift in advanced play)), plays a stroke from a position materially other than a point on a baulk-line and the error is discovered before the third stroke of the striker's turn, the error is rectified. The striker restarts his turn with the same ball unless it ended under Law 4(d) during a stroke in error. and, subject to Law 27(j), the striker restarts his turn correctly with the same ball.
    2. If the error is discovered after the limit of claims, play is deemed to have proceeded as if the striker's ball had been correctly placed when the first stroke was played.
  9. LIFTING A BALL WHEN NOT ENTITLED TO DO SO
    1. If the striker, having lifted either of his balls at the start of a turn when not entitled to do so, plays a stroke with it misplaced and the error is discovered before the third stroke of the striker's turn, the error is rectified. The striker restarts his turn with either ball of his side unless it ended under Law 4(d) during a stroke in error. and, subject to Law 27(j), the striker restarts his turn correctly with either ball of his side.
    2. If the error is discovered after the limit of claims, play is deemed to have proceeded as if the striker had been entitled to a lift or contact before he played the first stroke.
  10. OTHER CASES
    In all other cases, the stroke is lawful unless other errors or interferences have occurred.
      1. In all other cases, if the adversary fails to forestall play, the striker continues his turn subject to the law applicable to any other error or interference committed before or in the stroke. Examples of such cases include:
        1. playing without first replacing any ball irregularly moved after the end of the preceding stroke;
        2. playing the striker's ball when it has been wrongly brought onto the yard-line;
        3. playing when a ball has been wrongly left off the court or in the yard-line area.
      2. Subject to rectification of an error or discovery of an interference under Laws 30 or 31 committed before or in the stroke or, in exceptional cases, to Law 55, if the misplaced ball is affected by the stroke, it is deemed that its actual position was its lawful position before the stroke was played and Law 33 does not apply.
      3. If the misplaced ball is unaffected by subsequent play and it is then discovered by either player to have been misplaced, it must be replaced in a lawful position before the next stroke is played.
  11. END OF TURN If an error under Laws 27(e) to 27(h) is discovered before its limit of claims, all strokes in error must also be analysed as if that limit of claims had passed in order to decide whether the striker is entitled to continue his turn. For this purpose purporting to take croquet from a live ball shall be treated as playing a croquet stroke in which the live ball is the croqueted ball. If any of the conditions of Law 4(d) (end of turn) would then apply the striker's turn ends.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
B. ERRORS IN PLAY

28. FAULTS

  1. DEFINITIONS Subject to Law 28(d), a fault is committed if, during the striking period, the striker:
    1. touches the head of the mallet with his hand, or slides the mallet along his foot or leg to guide it; touches the head of the mallet with his hand;
    2. rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm on the ground or an outside agency;
    3. rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm directly connected with the stroke against any part of his legs or feet;
    4. moves the striker's ball other than by striking it with the mallet audibly and distinctly;
    5. causes or attempts to cause the mallet to strike the striker's ball by kicking, hitting, dropping or throwing the mallet;
    6. strikes the striker's ball with any part of the mallet other than an end face of the head, either:
      1. deliberately; or
      2. accidentally in a stroke which requires special care because of the proximity of a hoop or the peg or another ball;
    7. subject to Law 28(d), maintains contact between the mallet and the striker's ball for an appreciable period when the striker's ball is not in contact with any other ball or after the striker's ball has hit another ball;
      1. in a croquet stroke, or continuation stroke when the striker's ball is touching another ball, allows the mallet to contact the striker's ball visibly more than once; or
      2. in any other stroke, allows the mallet to contact the striker's ball more than once; or
      3. in any stroke, allows the mallet to remain in contact with the striker's ball for an observable period;
    8. allows the mallet to be in contact with the striker's ball after the striker's ball has hit another ball; subject to Law 28(d), strikes the striker's ball more than once in the same stroke or allows the striker's ball to retouch the mallet
    9. strikes the striker's ball so as to cause it to touch a hoop upright or, unless the striker's ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg when in contact with the mallet;
    10. strikes the striker's ball when it lies in contact with a hoop upright or, unless the striker's ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg otherwise than in a direction away therefrom;
    11. moves or shakes a ball at rest by hitting a hoop or the peg with the mallet or with any part of his body or clothes;
    12. touches any ball, other than the striker's ball, with the mallet;
    13. touches any ball with any part of his body or clothes;
    14. in a croquet stroke, plays away from or fails to move or shake the croqueted ball;
    15. damages the court with the mallet, to the extent that a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area could be significantly affected, in a stroke in which either:
      1. his swing is restricted by a hoop, or the peg, or a ball not in contact with the striker's ball; or
      2. he is attempting to make the striker's ball jump; or
      3. the striker's ball is part of a group.

    deliberately plays a stroke in a manner in which the mallet is likely to and does cause substantial damage to the court.

  2. REMEDIES
    1. If the striker commits a fault and the error is discovered before two further strokes of the strikerís turn, any points scored in either the first or second stroke in error are cancelled and the turn ends.
    2. The striker must ask the adversary whether he wishes the fault to be rectified. If the adversary elects rectification, the balls are replaced in accordance with Law 22(d). Otherwise the balls remain or are replaced in the positions they occupied after the first stroke in error (but see Law 37(h) for handicap play).
  3. SPECIFIED TERMS
    1. Clothes include everything being worn or carried by the striker at the start of the stroke, other than his mallet, and are treated as part of the strikerís body.
    2. Substantial damage to the court is damage capable of affecting a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area, normally involving breaking of the surface of the court.
  4. EXEMPTIONS
    1. Contact between the mallet and the striker's ball is not a fault under Laws 28(a)(7) or (8) if it occurs after the striker's ball:
      1. makes a roquet; or
      2. scores the peg point; or
      3. hits a ball pegged out in the stroke.
        However, exemption (A) does not apply if the striker's ball has hit another object after making the roquet.
    2. A fault is not committed under Laws 28(a)(1-3) if the touching, resting or sliding occurs after the striker has completed the swing in which he played the stroke.
      A fault is not committed under Laws 28(a)(7) or 28(a)(8) if a second hit, re-touching or maintenance of contact is caused by:
    1. a ball roqueted under Law 16(b); or
    2. the act of pegging out the strikerís ball; or
    3. interference by a ball pegged out in the stroke.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

29. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

  1. DEFINITION Interferences with play are irregularities other than errors and are dealt with under Laws 30 to 35 (but see Law 39(b) for restoration of bisques in handicap play and Law 53(g)(2) for restoration of time in time-limited games).
  2. DELIBERATE INTERFERENCE A player must not deliberately commit an interference.
  3. PLAYER MUST DECLARE A player must immediately forestall play and declare any interference he believes may have been committed by either player.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

30. BALLS WRONGLY REMOVED OR NOT REMOVED FROM GAME

  1. GENERAL If it is discovered before the end of the game that play has been affected because either:
    1. a ball has been removed from the game under the misapprehension that it has been pegged out; or
    2. a ball has not been removed from the game in accordance with Law 15 when it has been pegged out
    all play from and including the first affected stroke is deemed not to have occurred, any points scored for any ball therein are cancelled, the balls are replaced in their lawful positions at the end of the stroke preceding the first affected stroke and, subject to Law 30(b), the player entitled to play at that time continues his turn without penalty. If it cannot be determined when play was first affected it is deemed to be when the ball was first misplaced.
  2. EARLIER ERRORS If it is also discovered that the limit of claims of one or more errors had not passed when play was first affected, the relevant laws shall be applied as if the error or errors had been discovered at that time.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

31. MISPLACED CLIPS AND MISLEADING INFORMATION

  1. GENERAL A player is entitled to a replay if it is discovered before the end of the game that he was misled into adopting a line of play that he would not otherwise have adopted as a result of:
    1. the misplacement of a clip for which he was not originally responsible; or
    2. the misplacement of a ball that has suffered interference, other than by him, or been moved to avoid interference; or
    3. false information concerning the state of the game supplied by the adversary.
  2. REMEDY
    1. If a player successfully claims a replay, the first stroke that he would not have played but for his misapprehension and all subsequent play are deemed not to have occurred, any points scored for any ball therein are cancelled, the balls are replaced in their lawful positions before that first stroke and, subject to Law 31(c), the player misled then plays, adopting a different line of play.
    2. If that first stroke was also the first stroke of a turn, the player may play either ball of his side that could lawfully have been played in the first stroke of the turn.
  3. EARLIER ERRORS If it is also discovered that the limit of claims of one or more errors had not passed before that first stroke was played, the relevant laws shall be applied as if the error or errors had been discovered at that time.
  4. LINE OF PLAY A line of play is any tactical decision including, but not limited to, aiming to move a ball to a specific position on the court, electing to play with a particular ball, making a particular leave, deciding how many points to score, quitting the court in the belief that the turn has ended and exercising the option under Law 28(b) (see also Law 37(g) for handicap play).
  5. DUTY OF PLAYERS Both players have a duty to ensure that the clips are correctly placed and, subject to Laws 23(b) and 23(d), must call attention immediately to any misplaced clip.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

32. PLAYING WHEN FORESTALLED

  1. GENERAL If a player continues to play after the adversary has forestalled play and before the issue has been settled, all play following the forestalling is deemed not to have occurred, any points scored for any ball therein are cancelled, the balls are replaced in their lawful positions before the adversary forestalled play and the issue must then be settled. Subject to Law 32(b), the player entitled to play then plays.
  2. EARLIER ERRORS If it is also discovered that the limit of claims of one or more errors had not passed when the adversary forestalled play, the relevant laws shall be applied as if the error or errors had been discovered at that time.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

33. INTERFERENCE WITH THE POSITION OF A BALL

  1. OUTSIDE AGENCY OR PLAYER If an outside agency or a player (except the striker during the striking period) touches a ball during a stroke:
    1. the striker must replay the stroke if:
      1. no further stroke has been played; and
      2. the interference might have prevented a point being scored, a roquet being made, or a ball coming to rest in a critical position; and
      3. the interference was caused by an outside agency that moved or came to rest after the striker finally took up his stance, or by the adversary.
    2. otherwise, there is no replay and all balls must be placed as near as possible to where they would have been at the end of the stroke had the interference not occurred. (See Law 48(f) if the players' opinions differ).
  2. NATURAL FORCES If a ball is affected by natural forces, e.g. wind or gravity, during a stroke, it must be replaced if it was not moved by the stroke. Otherwise there is no remedy.
  3. BETWEEN STROKES If a ball moves or is unlawfully moved between strokes it must be replaced.
  4. INTERACTION WITH OTHER LAWS
    1. After relevant interference, a ball may not score a point, make a roquet nor be roqueted.
    2. In a croquet stroke, the turn ends under Law 20(c) if either ball would have gone off the court had the interference not occurred; it does not end merely because a ball went off as a result of interference.
    3. If a ball is not correctly placed or replaced before the next stroke , it becomes misplaced and Law 27(a) applies.”
  1. INTERFERENCE BY THE STRIKER If the striker interferes with a ball during the striking period, Law 28 applies if the interference is discovered before the limit of claims of the error. In all other cases, Law 33(d) applies and the striker continues his turn subject to the law applicable to any other error or interference that may have occurred.
  2. INTERFERENCE BY THE ADVERSARY OR AN OUTSIDE AGENCY If the outcome of a stroke is materially affected because the adversary or an outside agency has interfered with the position or motion of a ball and the interference is discovered before the next stroke, the stroke is replayed after replacing the balls in their lawful positions before the stroke was played. In all other cases, Law 33(d) applies.
  3. OTHER INTERFERENCE In all other cases, including the effect of extreme weather conditions, if a ball at rest moves or is moved between strokes or during a stroke that did not affect its position, it is deemed to have suffered interference, there is no penalty and Law 33(d) applies.
  4. REPLACEMENT OF A BALL AFTER INTERFERENCE If the ball was a ball at rest, it is replaced. If it was moving, it is placed where it would otherwise have come to rest. After interference during a stroke, a ball cannot subsequently in that stroke make a roquet, be roqueted, score a point for itself or cause another ball to move or score a point.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

34. INTERFERENCE WITH THE PLAYING OF A STROKE

  1. INTERFERENCE BY THE ADVERSARY OR AN OUTSIDE AGENCY If the outcome of a stroke is materially affected because:
    1. the adversary forestalled play in breach of Law 23(d); or
    2. the striker, the court or the equipment, other than balls, was touched by the adversary or an outside agency
    and the interference is discovered before the next stroke, the same stroke is replayed after replacing the balls in their lawful positions before the stroke was púlayed. Exceptional cases may be dealt with under Law 55.
  2. FIXED OBSTACLES AND CHANGES OF LEVEL Subject to Laws 34(e) and 48(c)(1) (consulting the adversary), if any fixed obstacle or change of level outside the court is likely to interfere with the playing of the next stroke, the striker may move the strikerís ball no more than is necessary to allow a normal stance and a free swing of the mallet.
  3. SPECIAL DAMAGE Subject to Laws 34(e) and 48(c)(1), if special damage to the court is likely to interfere with the playing of the next stroke, the striker may move any ball so affected no more than is necessary to avoid the damage and never to his advantage. As an alternative to moving a ball, the players may agree to repair the damage before play continues. Special damage is limited to Examples of special damage include a hole on a corner spot, an unrepaired or imperfectly repaired divot, hoop hole or peg hole and a protruding tree root, or a protruding tree root or sprinkler head. The normal hazards of an indifferent court, including a wear hole in a hoop, are not special damage.
  4. LOOSE IMPEDIMENTS Loose impediments are small items such as worm casts, twigs, leaves, nuts, refuse and similar material which may be removed by the striker at any time and must be removed if they are likely to benefit the striker in the stroke about to be played. Subject to Law 7(b), loose impediments are not outside agencies.
  5. MOVING OTHER BALLS When a ball is moved under Laws 34(b) or 34(c), the striker must also move any other ball that could foreseeably be affected by the next stroke so as to maintain their relative positions. However, a ball in a critical position should only be moved to avoid inequity. Any ball so moved, which has not been affected by subsequent play, must be replaced as near as possible to its original position as soon as it is no longer relevant to the strikerís line of play or, if earlier, when his turn ends.

PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
C. INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

35. MISCELLANEOUS INTERFERENCE

  1. TURN WRONGLY ENDING If the striker quits the court wrongly believing his turn has ended and the mistake is discovered before the first stroke of the adversary's turn, the striker's turn is deemed not to have ended and he resumes play. If the adversary becomes aware of the mistake he must inform the striker immediately.
  2. BALL JAMMED IN A HOOP If a ball jams in a hoop the equipment must be adjusted or replaced. If a ball remains jammed in a hoop at the end of a stroke then, provided that the turn has not otherwise ended and that no further stroke has been played, the striker may elect to replay the stroke.
  3. BALL STRIKING A CLIP OR THE PEG EXTENSION If a ball strikes a clip attached to a hoop or the peg, or the peg extension when attached to the peg, it is not interference with play and there is no remedy. However, an unattached clip or peg extension or a clip from another game is an outside agency and Law 33(a) 33(b) applies.
  4. DISPLACED BOUNDARY MARKING
    1. If a player becomes aware that a boundary marking is displaced he must forestall play in accordance with Law 23(c).
    2. If the marking was displaced before a stroke began and the straightening of it would affect a test as to whether a ball has left the court in that stroke or would affect the playing of the next stroke, such test or stroke must be completed before the marking is straightened.
    3. If the marking was displaced after the stroke began, or straightening it would not affect play, it must be straightened before such test or the next stroke is played.
    4. When a marking is straightened, any affected yard-line balls must be adjusted accordingly. Any other balls in the immediate vicinity must also be moved so as to maintain the relative positions of the balls.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY A. ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of advanced singles play, the laws applicable to ordinary level singles play apply subject to Law 36.

36. OPTIONAL LIFT OR CONTACT

  1. LIFT If the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored 1-back or 4-back for itself in that turn (see Law 45 for shortened games), the striker may start his turn:
    1. by playing as the balls lie; or
    2. subject to Law 36(c), by lifting either ball of his side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, and playing it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line or taking croquet from a ball that it could touch in such a position.
  2. LIFT OR CONTACT If the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored 1-back and 4-back for itself in that turn (see Law 45 for shortened games) and its partner ball had not scored 1-back before that turn, the striker may start his turn:
    1. as in Laws 36(a)(1) or 36(a)(2); or
    2. subject to Law 36(c), by lifting either ball of his side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, placing it in contact with any ball and taking croquet forthwith.
  3. WHEN NOT APPLICABLE The striker is not entitled to a lift or contact under this law if he has pegged out any ball during the game.
  4. FIRST FOUR TURNS OF GAME Law 36(b)(2) overrides the provision of Law 8(b) that requires balls played in the first four turns of the game to be played from a baulk-line.
  5. CHANGE OF DECISION If the striker lifts a ball of his side under Laws 36(a)(2) or 36(b)(2):
    1. that is not in contact with another ball it is thereby elected as the strikerís ball and the striker may not then play with his other ball. If he does so, Law 26 applies. In addition, he is obliged to take the lift or contact to which he is entitled and he may not then play the lifted ball from where it lay before it was lifted unless it already lay on a baulk-line.
    2. that is already in contact with his other ball, he remains entitled to take a lift or to take croquet with either ball until he plays a stroke.
    3. that is already in contact with another ball, he remains entitled to take croquet from that ball until he plays a stroke.
    4. and places it on an unoccupied point on either baulk-line or lawfully in contact with another ball, he remains entitled to play it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line until he plays a stroke.

Note: Within the CA domain, the Tournament Regulations 2009 allow the temporary introduction of Law 36(f) Lift, Contact or Free Placement.


PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY B. HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY  
When a game is played under the conditions of handicap singles play, the laws applicable to ordinary level singles play apply subject to Laws 37 to 39.

37. BISQUES

  1. DEFINITION A bisque is an extra turn given in handicap play and, subject to Law 37(f), can only be played by the striker with the striker's ball of the immediately preceding turn. If another ball is played, Law 26 (playing a wrong ball) applies. A half-bisque is a restricted bisque in which no point can be scored for any ball.
  2. NUMBER OF BISQUES TO BE GIVEN
    1. The number of bisques given by the lower-handicapped player to the higher is the difference between their handicaps (but see Law 43(a) for doubles play).
    2. A bisque may not be split into two half-bisques.
  3. WHEN A HALF-BISQUE OR BISQUE MAY BE PLAYED
    1. Subject to Law 53(g)(3) (time-limited games), the player receiving a half-bisque or one or more bisques may play it or them at the end of any of his turns except a turn in which the strikerís ball is pegged out. If he receives more than one, he may play them separately or some or all in succession.
    2. Law 37(c)(1) overrides Law 8(b) and permits half-bisques or bisques to be played after any of the first three turns of the game.
    3. The references in Law 26 to turns do not include half-bisques or bisques.
    4. A turn after which a bisque or half bisque is played ends when one of the conditions in Law 4(d) has been met, the last stroke of the turn has ended and the balls are correctly positioned.
  4. INDICATION OF INTENTION
    1. At the conclusion of a turn the striker must give a clear and prompt indication of his intention before playing a half-bisque or bisque to which he is entitled. If he fails to do so but continues to play no half-bisque or bisque is played and Law 25 applies. However, if the error is rectified, the striker may then play a half-bisque or bisque.
    2. If the striker is entitled to play either a half-bisque or a bisque and indicates an intention of playing one or the other, he may change his mind at any time before playing a stroke provided that he indicates his revised intention accordingly. If he indicates an intention of playing one or the other without specifying which, he is deemed to have indicated an intention of playing a bisque.
    3. If the striker has played all the strokes to which he is entitled and indicates that he is not going to play a half-bisque or bisque, either by words or by quitting the court without informing the adversary that he has not yet decided, he may not change his mind.
    4. The adversary must not start his turn until the striker has so indicated. If he does so and the error is discovered before the striker has quit the court, the error is rectified and the striker then chooses whether or not to play a half-bisque or bisque.
  5. PLAYING A HALF-BISQUE OR BISQUE TOO SOON The adversary must forestall play if he observes that the striker is about to play a half-bisque or bisque before his turn has ended (see Law 37(c)(4)) he has played all the strokes that he is already entitled to play. If the adversary fails to forestall and the striker plays a half-bisque or bisque prematurely, it is deemed that his turn ended before doing so. If the adversary fails to do so, it is deemed that the strikerís turn ended before he played the half-bisque or bisque and that the half-bisque or bisque turn began correctly.
  6. PLAYING A WRONG BALL If the striker plays a wrong ball in the first stroke of a non-bisque turn and the error is rectified, he may then play a half-bisque or bisque with either ball of his side that could lawfully have been played in the first stroke of the turn.
  7. MISPLACED CLIPS AND MISLEADING INFORMATION In Law 31(d), the expression ďline of playĒ includes a decision whether or not to play a half-bisque or bisque.
  8. RECTIFICATION OF FAULTS After committing a fault, the striker may delay a decision about playing a half-bisque or bisque until the adversary has decided about rectification.
    RECTIFICATION OF FAULTS If the striker decides to play a bisque after committing a fault that is discovered within the limit of claims, Law 28(b)(2) does not apply and the fault must be rectified.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY

B. HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY

38. PEGGING OUT IN HANDICAP GAMES

The striker may not peg out the striker's ball in a stroke unless, before or during that stroke, the partner ball became a rover or an adversaryís ball has been pegged out. If he does so and removes the striker's ball from the court, Law 30 applies.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY B. HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY

39. RESTORATION OF BISQUES

  1. AFTER AN ERROR
    1. If an error is rectified, any half-bisque or bisque played by the striker after the first stroke in error is restored.
    2. If a game is restarted under Law 26(b), any half-bisque or bisque played by either player is restored.
    3. If any point is cancelled because it is discovered before the end of the game that it was scored out of order, any half-bisque or bisque played by the striker is restored if it was played with the relevant ball as the striker's ball after the first hoop was run out of order with that ball.
      If any point is cancelled because it is discovered before the end of the game that it was scored out of order, any half-bisque or bisque played by the striker is restored if it was played with the relevant ball as the strikerís ball after the last point in order was scored for that ball.
  2. AFTER INTERFERENCE If play is deemed not to have occurred under Laws 30 to 32, any half-bisque or bisque played during such play is restored.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY C. DOUBLES PLAY

40. GENERAL

  1. AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME The game is played between two sides, each of two players. Each player may strike only one ball during the game as determined by the first stroke played by his side.
  2. ASSISTANCE TO PARTNER Subject to Law 49(c), a player may advise and instruct his partner and assist in the playing of a stroke by indicating the direction in which the mallet is to be swung and by placing balls the balls for a croquet stroke. However, when the stroke is actually played, he must stand well clear of the striker and of any spot which might assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of the stroke. A player may declare that his partner is playing a stroke, leaving his partner's ball where it lies.
  3. MODIFICATION OF TERMS
    1. Subject to Law 40(c)(2), in these Laws "partner's ball" is substituted for "partner ball" and, where appropriate, the words "player" and "adversary" also include "side" and the word "striker" includes "striker's partner".
    2. In Law 28, the word "striker" includes "striker's partner" only in respect of Law 28(a)(12), as amended by the deletion of the words "other than the striker's ball", and Law 28(a)(13). However, no fault is committed if the striker's partner moves, picks up or arrests a ball that is not relevant to the stroke or in accordance with Laws 3(c)(2),15(c) or 18(a)(2).
  4. PLAYING A WRONG BALL No point may be scored by the striker for the partnerís ball by directly striking it with his mallet. Any point apparently so scored must be cancelled if discovered at any time before the end of the game and, if a peg point has been apparently so scored, Law 30 applies.
  5. MISPLACED CLIPS AND MISLEADING INFORMATION If a side is entitled to a replay under Law 31 from the start of a non-bisque turn, either player may play in the replay.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY C. DOUBLES PLAY

41. ORDINARY DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of ordinary doubles play, the laws of ordinary singles play apply subject to Law 40.


PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY C. DOUBLES PLAY

42. ADVANCED DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of advanced doubles play, the laws of ordinary doubles play apply subject to Law 36.


PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY C. DOUBLES PLAY

43. HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of handicap doubles play, the laws of ordinary doubles play apply subject to Laws 37 to 39 and the following additional laws.
  1. NUMBER OF BISQUES TO BE GIVEN Law 37(b)(1) does not apply. The number of bisques given by the lower-handicapped side to the higher is half the difference between their aggregate handicaps. A fraction of a bisque above a half is counted as one bisque, a fraction below a half as a half-bisque.
  2. PLAYING A WRONG BALL Law 37(f) does not apply. If the striker plays a wrong ball in the first stroke of a non-bisque turn and the error is rectified, either player who could lawfully have played the first stroke of the turn may then play a half-bisque or bisque.
  3. PEELS Neither player of a side may peel his partner's ball through more than four hoops in the course of a game (but see Law 46(b) for shortened games).

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY D. SHORTENED GAMES

44. SHORTENED GAMES

The standard game of 26 points may be modified as follows:
  1. 22 POINT GAME The game is started with all the clips on hoop 3.
  2. 18 POINT GAME The following variations are permitted.
    1. The game is started with all the clips on hoop 5.
    2. The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1 and the peg point is the next point in order after 2-back.
    3. The standard setting is modified by removing the centre hoops; the game is started with all the clips on hoop 1, 1-back is the next point in order after hoop 4 and the peg point is the next point in order after 4-back.
    4. The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1 but as soon as one of the balls of a side scores hoop 1 for itself or by being peeled through hoop 1, 3-back becomes the next hoop for its partner ball and the appropriate clip is placed on 3-back immediately. If both the strikerís ball and the partner ball complete the running of hoop 1 in the same stroke, it is deemed that hoop 1 was only scored by the strikerís ball. This variation is for singles play only.
  3. 14 POINT GAME The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1 and the peg point is the next point in order after hoop 6.
  4. ROVER HOOP In the variations defined in Laws 44(b)(3), 44(b)(4) and 44(c), the rover hoop is the last hoop point in order..

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY D. SHORTENED GAMES

45. ADVANCED PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

  1. 18 POINT GAME Law 36 (optional lift in advanced play) applies with the omission of Law 36(b). However, in the variations set out below, the following hoops are substituted for hoops 1-back and 4-back in Law 36(a):
    Law 44(b)(2) hoops 4 and 6.
    Law 44(b)(3) hoops 4 and 2-back.
  2. 14 POINT GAME (LIFT VERSION) Law 36 (optional lift in advanced play) applies with the omission of Law 36(b) and the substitution of hoop 4 for hoops 1-back and 4-back in Law 36(a).
  3. 14 POINT GAME (LIFT OR CONTACT VERSION) Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) applies with the substitution of hoops 3 and 4 for hoops 1-back and 4-back.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY D. SHORTENED GAMES

46. HANDICAP PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

  1. BISQUES The number of bisques to be given in a shortened game is the number that would be given under Law 37(b) in singles play or under Law 43(a) in doubles play (before rounding) scaled down in accordance with Schedule 1
  2. PEELS In handicap doubles play, Law 43(c) is modified as follows.
    1. 22 or 18 point games: three hoops;
    2. 14 point games: two hoops.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

47. THE STATE OF THE GAME

  1. DEFINITION The state of the game includes, but is not limited to, which ball the striker has elected as the strikerís ball, the correct positions of the balls or clips; whether an error or interference has been committed; which player is responsible for the position of a ball; whether a ball has been roqueted or hit or has moved; whether a ball has scored a hoop point or is clear of a given side of a hoop; whether there is an entitlement to a lift or contact and the amount of time or number of bisques remaining.
  2. ASKING THE ADVERSARY A player is entitled to ask the adversary about the state of the game at any time and the adversary is obliged to reply to the best of his ability. If the adversary gives information that is discovered to have been incorrect, Law 31 may apply.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

48. REFEREES OF THE GAME

  1. THE PLAYERS AS JOINT REFEREES
    1. The players act as referees of the game in the absence of a referee in charge and thereby incur duties as well as rights (see Law 48(b)). In doubles play, all four players act as referees of the game.
    2. A player is not obliged to watch the game when he is not the striker but he ceases to be a referee of the game while he is not so watching.
  2. CERTAIN SPECIFIED DUTIES OF A REFEREE OF THE GAME As a referee of the game the striker must immediately announce any error or interference he believes or suspects he may have committed. Likewise, the adversary must immediately forestall play in accordance with Law 23 in relation to any error or interference that he suspects or of which he becomes aware, notwithstanding that it may be to his disadvantage to do so. Further similar but not exhaustive examples are:
    1. subject to Law 23(b), a player must immediately draw attention to a misplaced clip;
    2. if the adversary observes that the striker is about to leave the court wrongly believing that his turn has ended, he must inform him that he must complete his turn by playing another stroke or deeming it to have been played (see Law 35(a));
    3. in handicap play, if the striker announces his intention of playing a half-bisque or bisque before he has played all the strokes that he is already entitled to play, the adversary must similarly inform him (see Law 37(e));
    4. a player must on request give the adversary any information concerning the state of the game (see Law 47(b)).
  3. CONSULTING THE ADVERSARY The striker must consult the adversary before:
    1. moving a ball in accordance with Law 34; or
    2. playing a questionable stroke without calling a referee; or
    3. temporarily removing a ball in accordance with Law 3(c)(2) if it is in a critical position; or
    4. testing, otherwise than by an unaided ocular test, whether a ball has scored a hoop point, is in position to score a hoop point, is off the court or is entitled to a wiring lift.
  4. QUESTIONABLE STROKES
    1. A questionable stroke is a term applied to the strikerís next stroke if either he or the adversary suspects that its fairness or effect may be doubtful. Examples include but are not limited to a stroke in which a fault might be committed, an attempted roquet of a ball in a hoop, a distant attempted peg-out and any stroke that might cause a ball to leave the court when the striker is unable to ensure its accurate placement on the yard-line replacement in a critical or potentially critical position.
    2. Unless the striker has already called a referee, he must consult the adversary before playing a questionable stroke and, unless the adversary agrees otherwise, must arrange to have it specially watched, preferably by a referee or other independent person if available, or, failing these, by the adversary.
    3. It is the striker's duty to take the initiative in this respect but if he fails to do so the adversary should forestall play (see Law 23(c)(1) and, if the striker fails to cease play, Law 32). However, if the adversary fails to forestall play before what he should have recognised as a questionable stroke, he may not appeal other than on a question of law, but should remind the striker to take the initiative in having any further questionable strokes specially watched.
    4. A fault under Law 28 is to be declared if a person watching the stroke under Law 48(d)(2), or the striker, believes it more likely than not that the law was infringed.
  5. THE STRIKER AS THE ACTIVE REFEREE The adversary must not follow the striker round the court and should allow most decisions to be made by the striker without reference to himself. If, however, a close decision has to be made and the adversary is in at least as good a position to give that decision the striker must consult the adversary before continuing to play.
  6. WHEN THE PLAYERS' OPINIONS DIFFER If a ball has to be placed or replaced because of the carelessness of a player, or play in breach of Law 7(c), the offender should normally defer to the opinion of the other. When the question is whether a ball has been hit or has moved, the positive opinion is generally to be preferred to the negative opinion. In other cases, the opinion of the player better placed to give one is generally to be preferred. If there are any reliable witnesses present the players should agree to consult them to resolve any differences but no player may consult a witness without the express permission of the other. Either player may request that a referee adjudicate.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

49. EXPEDITION IN PLAY

  1. GENERAL The striker must position the balls and play his strokes with reasonable despatch. The adversary should anticipate as far as possible with which ball he will play next so that he may waste no time in approaching it at the start of his turn.
  2. HANDICAP PLAY In handicap play, the striker must indicate promptly at the end of his turn whether or not he intends to play a half-bisque or bisque.
  3. DOUBLES PLAY In doubles play, time must not be wasted in prolonged discussion or instruction.
  4. WIRING TEST See Law 13(e)(1) for restrictions on testing if a ball is wired.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

50. ADVICE AND AIDS

  1. ADVICE A player is not entitled to receive advice from anyone, except his partner in doubles play and, subject to Law 51(a), should not take advantage of unsolicited information or advice. However, if someone other than the adversary or a duly authorised referee informs:
    1. a player that he has committed an error, and does so after the player has quitted the court believing that the requirements of Law 4(e)(1) have been met, the player must not declare the error.
    2. the striker that he has committed an error, the striker must immediately declare the error if he believes the information or advice to be correct and the limit of claims has not passed.
    3. the adversary that the striker has committed an error, the adversary must, subject to Law 23(b), immediately forestall play if he believes the information or advice to be correct and the limit of claims has not passed.
    4. a player that an interference under Laws 30 or 31 has been committed, the player must immediately declare the interference if he believes the information or advice to be correct.
    In Laws 50(a)(2), 50(a)(3) and 50(a)(4), once the error has been dealt with, Law 55 must be applied when necessary to restore the balance of the game as nearly as possible to its state before the unsolicited information or advice was given.
  2. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE The striker may not make use of technical assistance from any written or electronic source, or artificial aids such as coins to assist him in placing a ball for a stroke.
  3. MARKERS No mark or marker may be made or placed inside or outside the court to assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of a stroke or in placing a ball for a stroke, other than as follows:
    1. the striker's mallet or that of his partner in doubles play may be used as a marker before the stroke starts;
    2. the striker's partner in doubles play may act as a marker subject to Law 40(b); and
    3. ball markers used to mark the position of a ball that must be temporarily removed or may have to be replaced.
  4. TRIAL BALL During a game a ball must not be used as a trial ball for any purpose other than as part of the lawful positioning of a ball for a stroke or to permit the discharge of the duties of a referee.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME A. GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

51. MISCELLANEOUS LAWS OF CONDUCT

  1. INTERRUPTING THE STRIKER The adversary must not interrupt, distract, interfere with or offer advice to the striker except to forestall play in accordance with Law 23. If he does so, Law 55 may apply and the striker may take advantage of any such advice.
  2. PRESENCE ON COURT The adversary must not ordinarily remain on the court when the striker is playing or move onto it until the striker's turn has ended and, in handicap play, until the striker has indicated that he does not intend to play a half-bisque or bisque.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME B. SPECIAL LAWS

52. DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES

  1. GENERAL More than one game may be played concurrently on one court using differently coloured sets of balls. The players, balls, clips and mallets of one game are outside agencies with respect to the other game.
  2. PRECEDENCE Subject to Law 52(c)(2), precedence should normally be given to players in the following order:
    1. to a player who is making a break;
    2. to a player who is most likely to get clear of the relevant area first;
    3. to a player who will not require balls from another game to be marked and moved.
  3. MARKING BALLS If a ball from another game might interfere with a player's next stroke:
    1. if it is not in a critical position, the permission of the players of the other game should be obtained so that it may be temporarily removed after its position has been marked;
    2. if it is in a critical position, the player should normally interrupt his turn until it has been removed in the normal course of play in the other game.
  4. ADDITIONAL LAWS OF CONDUCT
    1. The players of each game should be aware of the course of play in the other game, especially when stepping onto the court. In particular, they should avoid crossing another player's line of aim. Interference by balls or players of the other game is dealt with under Laws 33 and 34.
    2. All players should carry suitable ball markers.
    3. In doubles play, the striker's partner should be ready to mark balls in either game on the court.
    4. One game should not normally be started within five minutes of the start of the other game.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME B. SPECIAL LAWS

53. TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY

In tournaments and matches the following additional laws apply.
  1. REGULATIONS FOR TOURNAMENTS The laws other than Law 55 are subject to any provisions in the current Regulations for Tournaments published by the governing body under whose jurisdiction the tournament or match is taking place.
  2. HOOP DIMENSIONS
    1. The hoops shall be set according to the conditions advertised for the event. Hoops with larger uprights and crowns may also be specified.
    2. If so advertised in the conditions for an event, the following clause replaces Law 35(b).
    3. If a player suspects that the outcome of a stroke he has just played was affected by a ball being in contact with both uprights of a hoop simultaneously, he is entitled to have the equipment checked and, if necessary, adjusted or replaced. If it is found that the ball does touch both uprights of that hoop on some axis, he may elect to replay the stroke, unless his turn has ended for another reason.
  3. QUESTIONABLE STROKES A referee must always be called if available before a questionable stroke is played and to decide all disputes. If both the striker and the adversary fail to call a referee before what the adversary should have recognised as a questionable stroke, there is no appeal except on a question of law (see Law 48(d)(3)).
  4. TESTING The players should call a referee to perform any test normally carried out by the players. During such a test both players are entitled to be on the court to watch, provided they do not interfere, and have the right of appeal to the Tournament Referee if they believe the test is being conducted incorrectly.
  5. REPEATED FAULTS If the adversary believes that the striker is repeatedly committing faults in strokes that would not ordinarily require the presence of a referee, he should inform the striker and call a referee to watch a stroke or series of strokes or to take charge of the game temporarily. The striker has no justification for taking offence as players may genuinely differ as to what constitutes a fault.
  6. IMPASSE An impasse exists when neither player is willing to make significant progress. Impasses shall be resolved according to the conditions advertised for the event and, failing which, at the discretion of the Tournament Referee.
  7. TIME-LIMITED GAMES
    1. WINNER Law 4(b) applies but, if neither side has pegged out both its balls in the time allotted for the game, the game is won by the side which has scored the greater number of points when the game ends in accordance with the relevant provisions in the Regulations for Tournaments.
    2. RESTORATION OF TIME
      1. ERRORS Time is not restored following discovery of an error whether before or after the limit of claims.
      2. INTERFERENCE Time is restored if an interference under Laws 30 to 32 is discovered before the end of the game.
    3. HANDICAP PLAY Law 37(c)(1) applies subject to any restriction in the Regulations for Tournaments governing time-limits.
    4. END OF TURN Law 4(e) applies subject to any restriction in the Regulations for Tournaments governing time-limits.
  8. DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES Double-banked games are additionally subject to any relevant provisions in the Regulations for Tournaments.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME B. SPECIAL LAWS

54. LOCAL LAWS

Clubs or persons controlling courts may request the appropriate governing body to approve a local law in order to meet a special need. If a local law is so approved, play must be in accordance therewith provided that it is properly advertised at the club or courts concerned.


PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME B. SPECIAL LAWS

55. OVERRIDING LAW

  1. INTERPRETATION In any case where the interpretation of a law appears to be uncertain, players and referees should refer to the Official Rulings on the Laws of Croquet. If no definitive answer is thereby obtained, they should have regard to the spirit and traditions of the game and apply the interpretation most consistent with the intent of the laws in analogous cases.
  2. EMERGENCY PROVISION The following situations must be dealt with in accordance with Law 55(c):
    1. a deliberate breach of these laws or the encouragement of another player to do so; or
    2. an infringement of these laws for which no penalty is otherwise prescribed; or
    3. a situation where Law 55 is stated to be potentially relevant (see Laws 2(b)(1), 2(b)(5), 7(b), 27(i), 34(a), 50(a) and 51(a)) and is invoked; or
    4. any situation which does not appear to be adequately covered by these laws.
  3. EXTENT OF REMEDY In applying the emergency provision, a referee must act as best meets the justice of the case. The actions he may take include, but are not limited to, directing that:
    1. the position of one or more balls or hoops or the peg be changed; or
    2. one or more points be scored or lost; or
    3. a stroke must be played from a particular position; or
    4. a particular player shall have the innings; or
    5. an error discovered within the limit of claims be left unrectified; or
    6. an interference be left uncorrected; or
    7. time be restored in a time-limited game; or
    8. one or more bisques be restored in a handicap game; or
    9. a player be disqualified.

APPENDIX 1

TOLERANCES AND METRIC EQUIVALENTS OF STANDARD DIMENSIONS

LAW
SUBJECT
IMPERIAL UNITS
TOLERANCE
METRIC EQUIVALENTS
TOLERANCE
2 The court
35 yards
+/- 6 inches
32.0 metres
+/- 150 mm.
   
28 yards
+/- 6 inches
25.6 metres
+/- 150 mm.
   
13 yards
+/- 3 inches
11.9 metres
+/- 75 mm.
   
7 yards
n/a
6.4 metres
n/a
   
1 yard
n/a
0.9 metres
n/a
           
3(a) The peg
18 inches
+/- 1 inch
450 mm.
+/- 25 mm.
   
6 inches
n/a
150 mm.
n/a
   
1.5 inches
+/- ¼ inch
38 mm.
+/- 6 mm.
           
3(b) Hoops
12 inches
+/- ½  inch
300 mm.
+/- 12.5 mm.
   
4 inches
+/- 1/32 inch
100 mm.
+/- 0.8 mm.
   
3 3/4 inches
+/- 1/32 inch
95 mm.
+/- 0.8 mm.
   
5/8 inch
+/- 1/8 inch
16 mm.
+/- 3 mm.
           
3(c) Balls
3 5/8 inches
+/- 1/32 inch
92 mm.
+/- 0.8 mm.
   
16 ounces
+/- ¼ ounce
454 grams
+/- 7 grams
           
3(f) Corner flags
12 inches
n/a
300 mm.
n/a.
           
3(g) Corner pegs
3 inches
n/a
75 mm.
n/a
   
3/4 inch
n/a
19 mm.
n/a

APPENDIX 2

BALL PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS

  1. When dropped from a height of 60 inches onto a steel plate 1 inch thick set rigidly in firmly-based concrete, a ball must rebound to a height of not less than 30 inches and not more than 45 inches.
  2. The rebound heights of a set of balls to be used in a game must not differ by more than 3 inches.

APPENDIX 3

FULL BISQUE HANDICAP PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of Full Bisque Handicap Play, the laws of Handicap Play apply subject to the following modifications.

1. THE BASE HANDICAP

The base handicap is scratch unless agreed or directed to be greater than scratch.

2. SINGLES PLAY

If both players have handicaps that are greater than the base handicap, the first sentence of Law 37(b)(1) does not apply and each player receives a number of bisques equal to the difference between his handicap and the base handicap.

3. DOUBLES PLAY

  1. NUMBER OF BISQUES If both sides have aggregate handicaps that are greater than twice the base handicap, the first sentence of Law 43(a) does not apply and each side receives a number of bisques equal to half the difference between its aggregate handicap and twice the base handicap.
  2. RESTRICTION ON PLAY A player whose handicap is lower than the base handicap may play a half-bisque but may not play a bisque and the second sentence of Law 43(b) is modified accordingly.

APPENDIX 4

ALTERNATE STROKE HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of Alternate Stroke Handicap Doubles Play, the laws of Handicap Doubles Play apply subject to the following modifications.

1. NON-APPLICATION OF VARIOUS LAWS

Law 37(f), Law 40(a) and Law 43(b) do not apply.

2. ALTERNATE STROKE PLAY

Subject to Paragraph 3 below, the players of each side play alternate strokes throughout the game and from turn to turn, whether such turns are ordinary turns, bisques or half-bisques. Thus the partner of the player who played the last stroke of a turn plays the first stroke of his sideís next turn.

3. ERRORS

  1. PLAYING OUT OF SEQUENCE
    1. If an adversary observes that a player is about to play out of sequence, he must forestall play immediately.If a player plays out of sequence and the error is discovered before the offending side has played two further strokes, the error is rectified and the correct player then plays. Any half-bisque or bisque played after the first stroke in error is restored (see Law 39(a)(1)).
    2. If the error is discovered after the limit of claims, play is deemed to have proceeded as if the player had not played out of sequence and play continues according to the sequence thereby established.
  2. OTHER ERRORS If any other error is rectified, the partner of the player who played the first stroke in error plays the first stroke of his sideís next turn.

4. INTERFERENCES

If play is deemed not to have occurred following discovery of an interference under Laws 30 to 32, the player who played the first affected stroke plays the first stroke of his sideís next turn.
 

APPENDIX 5

ADVANCED HANDICAP PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of Advanced Handicap Play, the laws of both Advanced Play (Laws 36 and 42) and Handicap Play (Law 37 to 39 and 43) apply subject to the following modifications:

1. BISQUES IN RELATION TO LIFT OR CONTACT

Any half-bisque or bisque is counted as part of the "preceding turn" for the purpose of determining the entitlement to a lift or contact under Law 36. There is no restriction on taking a half-bisque or bisque after a turn in which a lift or contact has been taken.

2. PEGGING OUT IN ADVANCED HANDICAP GAMES

The restriction on pegging out the striker's ball in Law 38 does not apply.

APPENDIX 6

ONE-BALL PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of One-Ball play, the laws of Ordinary Level Singles Play, together with those of Advanced and/or Handicap Singles Play if specified, apply subject to the following modifications.

1. AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME

Each side consists of a single player who plays one ball, of any distinct colour, throughout. The object of the game is for each side to make its ball score 12 hoop points and a peg point, a total of 13 points, before the other side.

2.  THE START OF A GAME

The part of Law 8(b) that refers to the third and fourth turns does not apply.

3.  ADVANCED PLAY

The references to the partner ball in Law 36(b), Law 36(c), and the reference to the third and fourth turns in Law 36(d), do not apply.

4.  HANDICAP PLAY

Unless otherwise advertised in the conditions for the event, the number of bisques to be given is one third of the difference between the handicaps of the players, rounded to the nearest half or full bisque, except that handicaps below 2 are adjusted as follows before taking the difference:
 

1½ => 1

0 => -2

-1½ => -5

-3 => -8

1 => 0

-½ => -3

-2 => -6

 

½ => -1

-1 => -4

-2½ => -7

 


APPENDIX 7

SHORT CROQUET

Short Croquet is a shortened version of the game, primarily intended for play on smaller lawns. The laws of Handicap Singles Play apply, subject to the following modifications.

1. THE COURT

The standard court is a rectangle measuring 24 by 16 yards. The four outer hoops are 4 yards from the adjacent boundaries and the two inner hoops are 6 yards north and south of the peg.

2. THE COURSE

The game is 14 points; 6 hoops and the peg (see Law 44(c)).

3. THE HANDICAPPING SYSTEM

The Short Croquet Handicap Table, as published by the appropriate governing body from time to time, shall be consulted with reference to each playerís Association Croquet handicap to determine whether he is obliged to make one or more mandatory peels or entitled to receive one or more bisques. If both players are entitled to receive bisques, the principles of Full Bisque Handicap Croquet apply and each player receives the appropriate number of bisques indicated in the table.

4. MANDATORY PEELS

  1. EITHER BALL MAY BE PEELED Either ball of a side may be peeled by its partner ball to count as a mandatory peel.
  2. PLAYING WHEN NOT ENTITLED When the striker is in a position where the number of mandatory peels outstanding is equal to the number of hoop points remaining to be scored by his two balls, the strikerís ball does not score a hoop point for itself by running a hoop in order. If after running a hoop under these circumstances, the striker continues to play as if the strikerís ball had scored a hoop point for itself, Law 25 (playing when not entitled) applies.

5. PEELING AN ADVERSARYíS BALL

An adversaryís ball may be peeled without penalty, except that if the adversary has a number of mandatory peels outstanding equal to the number of hoop points remaining to be scored by his two balls, his number of mandatory peels outstanding is reduced by one for each peel made on either of his balls.

 6. PEGGING OUT

  1. NO PEG OUT BEFORE PARTNER BALL BECOMES A ROVER Law 38 applies.
  2. NO PEG OUT BEFORE COMPLETION OF MANDATORY PEELS The striker may not peg out the strikerís ball in a stroke unless, before or during that stroke, his last mandatory peel was completed. If he does so and removes the striker's ball from the court, Law 30 applies.
  3. CANCELLATION OF MANDATORY PEELS If the striker pegs out an adversaryís ball when the adversary still has mandatory peels outstanding, all such peels are cancelled.

7. WIRING LIFT

Law 13 applies but the first part of Law 13(a) is amended to read ďIf the adversary is responsible for the position of a ball (see Law 13(b)) of the strikerís side which is wired (see Law 13(c)) from its partner ball or, if that has been pegged out, from all other balls and not in contact with another ball, the striker may start his turn:Ē


APPENDIX 8

SCHEDULE 1

SCHEDULE OF BISQUES

Full
Game

22
point

18
point

14
point

Full
Game

22
point

18
point

14
point

 ¼

0

0

0

10¼

7

 ½

 ½

 ½

 ½

10½

9

7½

 ¾

 ½

 ½

 ½

10¾

9

6

1

1

 ½

 ½

11

6

1

1

 ½

11¼

8

6

1

1

11½

8

6

1

1

11¾

10

8

2

1

12

10

2

1

12¼

10½

2

12½

10½

2

12¾

11

9

7

3

2

13

11

9

7

3

2

13¼

11

9

7

3

2

13½

11½

3

2

13¾

11½

4

3

2

14

12

10

3

14¼

12

10

4

3

14½

12½

10

8

4

14¾

12½

10

8

5

4

15

12½

10½

8

3

15¼

13

10½

8

4

3

15½

13

10½

5

4

3

15¾

13½

11

6

5

4

3

16

13½

11

16¼

14

11½

9

16½

14

11½

9

16¾

14

11½

9

7

6

5

4

17

14½

12

9

6

5

4

17¼

14½

12

5

4

17½

15

12

4

17¾

15

12½

8

7

18

15

12½

7

18¼

15½

12½

10

7

6

18½

15½

13

10

6

18¾

16

13

10

9

6

5

19

16

13

10

8

5

19¼

16½

13½

10½

8

5

19½

16½

13½

10½

7

19¾

16½

13½

10½

10

7

20

17

14

11


INDEX A The index has not been updated with amendments

Acceptance of setting, 2(b)(5)
Accidental contact
  with ball
  between strokes, 33(a)
  preparing for stroke, 5(g)
Adjustment of setting
  hoop, 3(b)(3)
  peg, 3(a)(3)
Advanced play, 36
Adversary,
  anticipate play, must, 49(a)
  definition of, 1(d)
  must not interrupt striker, 51(a)
  forestalling play, 23
  let striker make decisions, 48(e)
  need not watch play, 48(a)(2)
  stay off court, 51(b)
Advice, 50
  doubles, in, 40(b), 50(a)
  prohibited, 51(a)
  unsolicited, 50(a)
Aids, 50(b)-(d)
Alternate stroke handicap doubles play, App.4
Assistance to partner, 40(b)

B

Ball, 3(c)
  at rest, 6(b)
  corner, 6(f)
  clear of a hoop, 6(i)
  court, off the, 10
  critical position, in a, 6(d)
  damaged, 3(c)(2)
  dead, 6(e)
  deemed to have come to rest, 6(b)(4),(5)
  groups of, 6(h), 16(d), 19(b)
  hole, in a, 33(c)
  in hand, 6(c)
  in play, 6(a)
  jammed in a hoop, 35(b)
  live, 6(e)
  markers, 50(c)
  moving between strokes, 33(c)
  off the court, 10
  replacement, 12
  croquet stroke, in, 20(c)
  replacement, 3(c)(2), 12
  rover, 1(c), 6(g), 15(a)
  specifications, 3(c)(1), App. 2
  temporary removal, 3(c)(2)
  trial or test ball, 50(d)
  wiping, 3(c)(2)
  wired, 13
  yard-line, 6(f), 12
  yard-line area, in, 11
Baulk-lines, 2(a)(4)
Bisques, 37
  doubles play, in, 43(a)
  restoration of, 39
  shortened games, 46(a)
Body, striker's, 28(c)(1)
Books, striker cannot use, 50(b)
Boundary, 2(a)(2)
  ball off court, 10
  displaced, 35(d)

C

Cannon, 19(b)
Changing mallet, 3(e)(6)
Change of level, 34(b)
Choice
  balls, of, 8(a), 26(c)
lead, of, 8(a)
  replacement positions, of, 6(c)(4), 12(b)
  start, of,
   See Choice of lead
Clips, 3(d)
  misplaced, 31
  declare misplaced, 23(c)(5)
Clothes, 28(c)(1)
  move ball, 28(a)(9), (13)
Compound errors, 24
Conduct and refereeing, 47-51
Contact, 36
Continuation stroke, 21
Corner ball, 6(f)
Corner flags, 3(f), Dia 2
Corner pegs, 3(g), Dia 2
Corner spots, 2(a)(3), Dia 2
  hole on, 34(c)
Correcting court setting,
  ball jammed in hoop, 35(b)
  boundary lines, 35(d)
  hoops, 3(b)(3)
  peg, 3(a)(3)
Court, 2(a)
  accessories, 3
  adversary, presence of, 51(b)
  damage by mallet, 28(a)(15)
  setting, 2(a), (b)
  special damage, 34(c)
Critical position, balls, 6(d)
Croquet stroke, 19, 20
  ball in hoop, 14(d)
  ball off court, 20(c)
  balls not in contact, 27(b)
  failing to take, 27(e)
  fail to move or shake ball, 28(a)(14)
  peels, 14(e), 43(c), 46(b)
  purported, 27(i)
Croqueted ball, 20(a)
  not moved or shaken, 28(a)(14)
  sent off court, 20(c)

D

Damage,
  balls, to, 3(c)(2)
  court, to, 28(a)(15)
  special, 34(c)
  substantial, 28(a)(15)
Dead ball, 6(e)
Declaring
  error, 22(c)
  interference, 29(c)
  misplaced clip, 23(c)(5)
Deemed
  come to rest, ball, 6(b)(4)
  roquet, 16(c)
  stroke, 5(f)
Definitions
  ball, states of a, 6
  error, 22(a)(1)
  game, start and end, 4
  interference, 29(a)
  outside agencies, 7(a)
  striking period, 5
  stroke, 5
  turn, start and end, 4
Deliberate errors, prohibited, 22(b), 55(b)
Discovery of error, 22(a)(3)
Disputes, 48(f)
Displaced boundary cord, 35(d)
Distracting a player, 34(a), 51(a)
Double tap, 28(a)(8)
Double-banked games, 52
Doubles play, 40-43

E

Election
  striker's ball, of, 9, 19(c)
  roqueted ball, 19(c)
Emergency law,
  See Overriding law 55
End
  game, of, 4(c)
  striking period, of, 5(h)
  stroke, of, 5?
  time limited games, of, 53(g)(4)
  turn, of,
    definition, 4(e), 53(g)(4)
    premature, 35(a), 37(e)
Errors 22-27
  adversary must forestall, 23(c)
  compound, 24
  deliberate, 22(c), 55(b)
  discovery, of, 22(a)(3)
  limit of claims, 22(e)
  rectification, 22(d)
  striker must declare, 22(c)
Equipment and accessories, 3
Expedition in play, 49

F

Fail to remove ball from game, 30
Fail to take croquet, 27(e)
Faults, 28
Forestalling play, 23, 29(c)
  discovery of error, 22(a)(3)
Foul stroke
  See Faults
Full bisque play, App. 3

G

Game, 1
  end, of, 4(c)
  double-banked, 52
  restart, 26(b)
  start, of, 4(a), 8(b)
Group of balls, 6(h), 16(d), 19(b)

H

Hampered stroke,
  fault, 28(a)(6)(B)
  obstacle outside court, 34(b)
Hand or arm on
  ground, 28(a)(2)
  leg or foot, 28(a)(3)
Handicap play, 37-39
  doubles, 43
  shortened games, 46
Help, 40(b), 50
Hit ball accidentally
  between strokes, 33(a)
  when aiming, 5(g)
Hit ground
  damage to lawn, 28(a)(15)
  stroke, whether a, 5(d)(2)
Hit hoop or peg and move ball, 28(a)(9)
Hit wrong ball
  See Playing a wrong ball 26
Hole,
  court surface, on, 34(c)
  hoop, in, 34(c)
Hoops, 3(b)
  adjusting, 3(b)(3)
  ball jammed in, 35(b)
  colours, 3(b)(2)
  jaws, of, 14(a)(4)
  order, of, 1(c), Diag. 1
  specifications, of, 3(a)
Hoop point, 14, 17
Hoop and roquet, 1

I

Impasse, 53(f)
Impeded swing, 13(d), 34(b)
Imperfections on the court, 34(c)
Interference, 29-35
  adversary, by, 33(b)
  ball during stroke, with, 33(b)
  outside agency, by, 33(b)
  player, with, 34(a)
  position of ball, with, 33
  stroke, with, 34
Interrupting a player
  forestalling, 23
  prohibited, 51(a)

J

Jaws of hoop, 14(a)(4)
Joint referees, 48(a)
Jump shot, damage by, 28(a)(15)

K

Keeping balls in position, 19(f)
Kick, hit, drop or throw mallet, 28(a)(4)

L

Lawn. See Court
Leave court.
  See Quit the court
Lifting a ball, 9(c)
Limit of claims, 22(e)
Line of play, 31(d), 37(g)
Live ball, 6(e)
Local laws, 54
Loose impediments, 7(b), 34(d)

M

Maintenance of contact, 28(a)(7)
Make a hoop,
  See Score hoop point
Make a roquet, 16, 17
Mallet, 3(e)
  changing, 3(e)(6)
  damage to court, by, 28(a)(15)
  marker, use as, 50(c)(1)
  touches another ball, 28(a)(12)
Marks or markers, 50(c)
Measure balls onto yard-line, 12
Misled, playing when, 31
Misplaced, play when ball, 27
Misplaced clips, 23(c)(5), 31
Miss ball, 5(d)(2), 5(e)
Mis-hit, 28(a)(5)
Mistakes in play, 22-33
Modified courts,
  See Smaller courts 2(b)(6)
Modified games,
  See Shortened games 44 - 46
Movable boundary, 2(b)(2), 34(b)
Move ball
  accidentally, 5(g)
  hitting hoop or peg, by, 28(a)(9)
  interference, after, 33(d)
  outside obstacle, to avoid, 34(e)
  special damage, to avoid, 34(e)
Multiple errors,
  See Compound errors 24

N

Non-playing side of hoop, 14(b)

O

Object of the game, 1(c)
Obstacles outside court, 34(b)
Opinions, differing, 48(f)
Opponent,
  See Adversary
Option to play either ball, 9(a)
Optional lift or contact, 36
  election of striker's ball, 9(b)(1)
  shortened games, 45
Order of hoops, 1(c), Diagram 1
Outside agencies, 7
  interference with play, 33(b)
Overriding law, 55

P

Partner, doubles, 40
  ball, 1(d)
Peels, 14(e)
  handicap doubles, 43(c)
  shortened games, 46(b)
Peg, 3(a)
  adjustment, of, 3(a)(2)
  extension, 3(a)(2)
  location, 2(a)(5), 2(b)(4,5)
  straightening, 3(a)(3)
Peg point, 15
  double tap not fault, 28(d)
  handicap play, in, 38
  wrongly removing or not removing balls, 30
Place balls for croquet stroke, 19
Planes of a hoop, 14(a)
Play a stroke, 5(a), 5(d)
Play ball as it lies, 5(f)
Play either ball, 8(b), 9(a)
Player responsible for ball, 13(b)
Players as joint referees, 48(a)
Playing a wrong ball, 26
Playing a wrong hoop,
  See Playing when not entitled 28(a)(7)
Playing quickly,
 See Expedition in play
Playing side of hoop, 14(b)
Playing when ball misplaced, 27
  ball not removed from game, 30(a)(2)
  ball wrongly removed from game, 30(a)(1)
Playing when misled, 31
  either doubles partner may replay, 40(e)
  false information, 31(a)(2)
  misplaced clip, 31(a)(1)
Playing when not entitled, 25
Position, responsibility for, 13(b)
Positive opinion preferred, 48(f)
Presence on court, 51(b)
Purporting to take croquet, 27(i)
  dead ball, from, 27(c)
  live ball, from, 27(d)
Pushing or pulling,
 See Maintenance of contact, 28(a)(7)

Q

Questionable stroke, 48(d), 53(c)
Quit stance, 5(h)
Quit the court
  bisques, 37(d)(3)
  game ends, 4(c)
  turn ends, 4(e)
  when opponent playing, 51(b)
  wrongly, 35(a)

R

Reading material, 50(b)
Rectification of errors, 22(d)
Refereeing, 48
Remove ball from game,
  temporarily, 3(c)(2)
  wrongly, 30
Repeated faults, 53(e)
Replacement of ball,
  after interference, 33(d)
  damaged, 3(c)(2)
  moved between strokes, 33(c)
  moved by clothes, 28(a)(13)
  yard-line, on, 12
Responsibility for position, 13(b)
Rest arm on ground or leg,
  See Hand or arm
Re-start game, 26(b)
Restoration of bisques, 39
Restoration of time, 53(g)
Right of choice, 8(a)
Roquet, 16 - 18
  also hit peg, 15(b)
Roqueted ball, 18, 19(a), 20(a)
  election of, 19(c)
Rover ball, 1(c), 6(g), 15(a)
Run a hoop,
  See Score hoop point
Wrong hoop, 23(d)

S

Score,
  clips, 3(d)(2)
hoop point, 14, 17
  peg point, 15
Setting, 2(a)(5),
  acceptance of, 2(b)(5)
  tolerances, 2(b)(4)
Shortened games, 44 - 46
Slow play, 49(a)
Smaller courts, 2(b)(6)
Special damage, 34(c)
Stance
  change of level, 34(b)
  quitting ends striking period, 5(h)
  wiring, and, 13(d)
Start
  game, of, 4(a), 8
  striking period, of, 5(c)
  stroke, of, 5(c)
  turn, of, 4(e)
State of game, 47(a)
Staying on court, 51(b)
Straighten
  hoop, 3(b)(3)
  peg, 3(a)(3)
Strike
  ball with mallet, 1(d)
  only one ball, 9(b)
  wrong ball,
    See Playing a wrong ball 26
Striker, definition of, 1(d)
Striker's ball
  definition of, 1(d)
  election of, 9, 19(c)
Striking period, 5(b)
  start, 5(c)
  end, 5(h)
Stroke
  deemed to be played, 5(f)
  played, when, 5(c)
  start of, 5(c)
  end of, 5?
Swing, 5(c)
  deliberate interruption, of, 5(e)
  impeded, 13(d)
  striking period, relevant to, 5(h)

T

Take a bisque, 37
Take croquet, 20(a)
Test ball,
  See Trial ball 50(d)
Three balls,
  See Group of balls
Time-limited games, 53(g)
Time restored, 53(g)(2)
Toss before start, 8(a)
Touch ball
  during striking, 28(a)(11), (12)
  other cases, 33(d)
Touch head of mallet, 28(a)(1)
Tournaments and matches, 1(h), 53
Trial ball, 50(d)
Turn
  alternation of, 1(e)(1)
  start and end, 4(e), 53(g)(4)

U

Unsolicited advice, 50(a)

W

Waiving fault rectification, 28(b)
Warning a player,
  See Forestalling
Watch game, adversary need not, 48(a)(2)
Weather, not an outside agency, 7(b)
Width of hoop, 3(b)(1), 53(b)
Winner, 4(b)
Wiping balls, 3(c)(2)
Wired balls, 13
Witnesses, consulting, 48(f)
Wrong ball played,
  See Playing a wrong ball 26
Wrong hoop made,
  See Playing when not entitled 25
Wrongly remove ball from game, 30(a)(1)
  handicap play, in, 38
  restoration
  bisques, of, 39(b)
  time lost, of, 53(g)(2)(B)

Y

Yard-line, 2(a)(3), Diagram 1
  area, 2(b)(3), Diagram 2
  ball, definition, 6(f)


Laws Copyright © The Croquet Association, 2000-8.
File formatting and linking Copyright © 2001-8 Dr Ian Plummer. Not to be distributed other than for free personal use.

All rights reserved © 2009-2014


Updated 2.viii.13
About, Feedback
oxfordcroquet.com/laws/6th/full/6th.asp
on www.oxfordcroquet.com
Hits: 11647