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Technical

Writing from the United States, Garth Elliassen gives advice and example press releases

By Garth Eliassen, Editor, National Croquet Calendar

At least 30 Days before a Major Tournament:
Two or Three Weeks before the Tournament:
One Week before the Tournament:
During the Tournament:
After the Tournament:
Some Press Release Guidelines:
A Press Release for a Local Clinic:
A Press Release for Results of a Local Tournament:
A Press Release Announcing a Major Tournament:
A Press Release Announcing the Results:

The following article was published in the September-October 2003 issue of the National Croquet Calendar.

One of the greatest problems we have in croquet - and always have had - is attracting new players to keep the sport going and avoid social stagnation through their enthusiasm and commitment. Word-of-mouth is one of the best ways to do this, and most club members have brought in a few friends by convincing them to give the game a try. Exposure to the public is another way to boost or at least maintain membership, but public clubs in public locations are, unfortunately, few and far between. The Greenwich Croquet Club, San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Denver, and a few other public sites have been able to keep a trickle of interest and new members by attracting passers-by who are curious enough to stop, watch for a few minutes, and ask questions. Hopefully a croquet player is always available to wander over, explain the game, answer their questions, and invite them to play. Regardless of the method used to attract new players, the next hurdle is keeping them. New players are grateful for a chance to learn the game and give it a try. But as those who have tried to attract new players know very well, the first day of play is not enough. Getting them to come back for more, then to stay involved in their new sport and join the club is just as difficult. The candidates have to be invited back several times, coaxed and cajoled, babysat, and convinced they are welcome before they will commit or pursue it on their own. The promoters of croquet have to become stalkers, and the potential new players their victims. At a minimum, new players should be given rosters of club members they can call for a game; those on the roster should, of course, be willing to the called, and be available often and willing to take new players under their wings. They should also preferably be somewhat high-handicap players, so the potential new player won't be intimidated in contacting them or playing with them. In addition to giving new players the club roster, they each should also be assigned a sponsor: a club member who has the time and is willing to make follow-up calls to invite them back to the court and try the game again. Many novices won't take the initiative to call on their own, but will be more willing to play again if someone else actually invites and encourages them.

Another strategy for attracting members is, of course, through frequent public clinics. The greatest advantage of clinics is more bang for the bucks, when one instructor can handle up to eighteen new players in one pop. Another plus of regular clinics is that a small cluster of new players will be starting and learning at the same level, so they might be less reluctant to take the initiative and try than if their only opportunities to try the game were against stronger players. I know, by the way, that golf croquet is becoming very popular in introductory clinics for new players. But golf croquet doesn't reflect the depth and intricacies of the American game, and the players we really want to attract - those who will stay - are the players who are actually fascinated by the concentration and strategy required, the minutiae of deadness, and the risks and consequences inherent in the game.

The clinics I prefer feature immersion in American-rules play: two hours of introduction, explanation, and instruction starting at 10 a.m. followed by four hours of doubles tournament play, where questions can be asked about the rules and the instructor is somewhat free to roam the court and give brief explanations and advice on basic strategy. By the end of the day, some of the fog (we all experienced) has begun to lift, and the new players might have seen and understood enough to draw them back for more. Regardless, after a full-day clinic the players are experienced enough with the protocol, rules, and basic strategy to participate in any high-handicap sanctioned tournament; not bad for one day's work.

Regardless of how potential players are drawn to the courts, the word has to get out. The best way to do that, other than word-of-mouth, is through the media. Whether promoting a small local clinic or a major tournament, press releases should be prepared and sent to newspapers and television stations. But in order to get a press release published, it has to meet some basic standards. Another difficulty we have been facing with promoting croquet through the media is the image of the game. Unfortunately, most sports editors have refused serious coverage of croquet events and have shuffled croquet news to feature pages. Some of these articles have been good, but most have been fluff pieces zeroing in on fancy white dresses, clinking champagne glasses, and shoot-and-giggle croquet. This kind of coverage generates some interest because it is cute, but the interest is not serious or long-lasting because it is promoted as a lark rather than a serious sport.

I realize the importance of the social aspect of the game, and there is no need to diminish or downplay that. But the public will never take us seriously until the press does. In order to get effective publicity, I suggest several steps. Much of what follows is pretty extensive and applies to large tournaments or events, such as regional or national championships, but the workload and basic information can be scaled down for club and local events as well

At least 30 Days before a Major Tournament:

A press officer should be appointed who will be responsible for sending out a press release announcing the tournament and another press release reporting its results. Whoever is appointed should have some journalism exposure or experience, be familiar with newspaper style, and be able to write an article that is flawless in grammar and usage. A note on style: Style books, a valuable source for any writer, are available at large bookstores. Most publishers recommend the "New York Times Manual of Style and Usage," the "Chicago Style Manual," or "The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual." For the National Croquet Calendar I use the granddaddy of them all, the "United States Government Printing Office Style Manual" (GPO) as a first source, then go to the others if I'm still in doubt. GPO is exceedingly - almost excessively - comprehensive: The New York Times manual, for example, has three paragraphs on compound words and the Associated Press has about ten; GPO has nine full pages of hyphenation rules and 39 pages of examples. (Also, by the way, for use with the National Calendar, I have my own eleven-page style manual that I constantly refer to for consistency in usage and spelling unique to croquet.)

The press officer should start to plan the publicity aspects of the tournament or event: Begin to assemble a list of media contacts to send the press releases to. This list should include on the national level major newspapers, news services such as AP and CNN, other television networks, and don't forget sports magazines and other sports-related interests. On the local level include all television and radio stations and local and regional publications. Don't forget to check for local or regional offices of news services; if AP, for example, has a local bureau, they might assign a reporter to cover the event. In the old days press releases were mailed, but I assume that nowadays they would all go by e-mail. E-mail addresses of publications and news services should be gathered, and at least one major media should be contacted and asked for advice and recommendations, either a wire service such as AP or a major regional newspaper such as the Washington Post or New York Times; call the editorial department and ask for the sports editor. Also ask about e-mailing photos: what format and resolution is best.

Prepare the b-copy that will give information on both six-wicket croquet and the event as well. B-copy should include a brief explanation of the game and strategy, maybe a paragraph on its history, and - always - contact information. B-copy is a journalism term for background information. Often, when a big story breaks, one reporter at a major newspaper will be assigned to write the lead, another reporter will write the b-copy, and others might do sidebars. In the world of obituaries, major publications and news services have libraries of b-copy (b-obits) written in advance for when someone of national or international prominence dies; then all a reporter has to do is write the lead and briefly update the b-copy. B-copy should be added at the end of the text of the press release, as editors will most likely trim some of it out depending on space requirements. But b-copy is important because if the editors still have a hole remaining after dropping in the story, the b-copy can help fill it.

Start writing the press release announcing the tournament. It should be as short as possible; if assignment editors or writers are interested in more detail they will contact you.

Two or Three Weeks before the Tournament:

Send out the press release announcing the tournament. Keep it simple. It might be a good idea to e-mail it on a Tuesday or Wednesday because it might have a better chance of getting published midweek than tangling with all the weekend sports coverage. If it looks like significant coverage (local and out-of-town reporters) is expected for a major event, plan to set up a players and press tent near the playing area where the press officer can hang out; the players can report their scores; the tournament director can compile, record, and post results; players and press can gather; and interviews can be conducted and questions answered. Free refreshments should be available here for press and players, and maybe a phone. Make it clear that it's for players and press only: keep out "unauthorized" people (rope and stanchion is a good idea; it discourages hangers-around and makes the players feel important). Plan press packages for any reporters who show up. For a local event the press package could contain the press release announcing the event, a rule book (opened to pages 22-23 with the court diagram!), local club and contact information, and brochures on croquet and the USCA. For a major event such as a regional or national championship, each press package should be in a large USCA envelope and include the press release announcing the tournament; the tournament program; a brief history of croquet and explanation of the game; a current rule book; a complete schedule of upcoming events across the country; a list of regional vice-presidents, district presidents, and office staff with addresses and complete contact information; the current list of equipment manufacturers; a USCA brochure; a National Croquet Center brochure; a Croquet Academy brochure and schedule; a current "Croquet News," and any goodies such as tournament pins or polo shirts or whatever else is being given to the participants.

One Week before the Tournament:

Make follow-up calls to select media that you hope will cover the tournament. In the case of local coverage find out if reporters will be sent; in the case of national coverage, let them know you will send results and find out what else they would like as soon as the event is over. Assemble the press packages based on the number of press expected. Pack a few extras.

During the Tournament:

At a local event the club president, tournament manager, or a reasonable spokesman should be available as needed to answer questions from any reporters (as well as to talk to new spectators). At a major event the press officer, the USCA president or representative, and key office staff should be available as needed.

After the Tournament:

After a major event the press release of the results, including the complete finishing positions and any photos, should be e-mailed to news media within three hours after the final game. Write a report on what you did and your recommendations for future events.

Now for some general thoughts: Dealing with sports editors is not an easy task. Most sports editors can't get Alice in Wonderland and the wire-wicket backyard kids' game out of their minds and will be anything from mildly reluctant to totally hostile to requests for serious coverage. They will probably tell you to contact the features department. Sports editors should be asked and encouraged to take a look at the real game and should be told that American championship croquet is the only outdoor sport in the world that places thinking and strategy above shot-making ability (in any given tournament, among relative equals, the winner will always be the player thinking the best, not shooting the best); that we have openings in croquet that are as complex as many chess openings; that it's one of very few sports where young play with old and men play with women in the same divisions; and that it is a game of defense and offence requiring thinking under great pressure, the cunning of a high-stakes poker player, and the raw nerves of a championship pool player. If they don't believe you, offer to send them some strategy articles (the Calendar's articles on the battle at #1 and the battle at #2 are good for skeptics). If all this fails and they still don't want anything to do with it, make sure you send them the press releases anyway. They might change their mind when they receive it (it could be a slow news day and they might need the copy), and it might put them on the spot if they don't run it (a call could be made or letter sent to the publisher, executive editor, or managing editor explaining croquet and asking why the news wasn't published).

Some Press Release Guidelines:

Always write straight. Don't overplay the event by exaggerating its importance. Write the headline straight (they'll rewrite it anyway, depending on the size and format they need): National Croquet Championships Set for September in Florida and never: Titans of Croquet in Historic Battle. Follow as far as possible proper news style and usage. Hard-copy press releases are always double-spaced because in the old days editors would edit (with actual pencils!) before sending them to the copy cutter (at large newspapers the copy cutter would literally cut the copy into short sections to send to different Linotype machines, where they would be set and then reassembled in galleys and proofed). But for e-mail press releases just single space; insert a line between paragraphs. Some people recommend indenting paragraphs; I don't because the indentation you do might not be consistent with the publication's style. The lead (one to three paragraphs) should tell who won and how, identify the event and location, and give the dates. Always follow the five Ws of journalism: who, what, when, where, and why (how).

Following paragraphs can go into more details, and the press release text can end with the b-copy. Do not use honorifics such as Mr. or Mrs. or Dr. or Lady or Sir or Princess anywhere in text or tables. Always use first names as well as last names unless a player is always known by his or her initials (C. B. Smith, B. J. Sharpe). Never use nicknames or appellations such as John "Swifty" Smith, unless a player is always known by it and then use it instead of the proper name and don't put it in quotes (Bud Holcombe, Mo Howlett, Buzz Lee). When referring to someone in text the first and last names should be used in the first reference, then only the last names in subsequent references; first names should only be used later if it's necessary to differentiate couples, relatives, or others with the same last names. Sometimes, however, I will repeat the first name if it's far enough away from the first reference that it makes it a burden for the readers to go back. Do not bend over backwards for political correctness that results in bad grammar or usage. Avoid junk like "If a player clears the last hoop, they can ..." Avoid fancy words like greensward and venue; use court and site or location. Never be cute or use inside jokes; the editor won't understand them and might be annoyed enough to yank the whole story (remember: we're trying to represent croquet as a serious sport). Never write "history was made" (croquet isn't history), and never end with "a good time was had by all" or other similar gibberish.

Always follow the copy with the complete final standings of all the players (first and last names!) in every flight. How do you expect the sports editors to take the game seriously if they are only given partial results? If the editors want to trim the final standings, they will (they probably will). I don't think you should tab in the tables, because I've found that e-mail text converts tabs to two or three spaces; then if the typesetter wants to tab the tables he will have to backspace before tabbing. I suggest tables be flush left with no space after the number: 3.John Jones 4.Keith Jones Then the typesetter will insert a space or tab after each number, depending on their style. Also avoid printing partial scores in either the copy or the finishing positions. It's very popular among International Rules players to report a score as +2 rather than reporting both players' points. But +2 is meaningless to both editors and the public at large, and it also omits important information about the game: was the final score 26-24, 12-10, or 2-0? That can make an extraordinary difference in hinting at the nature of the game. Reporting the full score simply gives a lot more information - often crucial information - and is therefore preferred.

In the finishing positions, list the top flights (both singles and doubles) first rather than all the singles followed by all the doubles. Depending on space available, a publication might trim from the bottom up; so if the championship doubles is listed after all the singles, it may be lost. Don't send burdensome or complex tournament details such as round-robin blocks, playoff ladders, or other results tables. Such details as tournament format and block winners can be explained, if needed, in the body of the press release.

Datelines: I don't see the need for them in sending out a press release (the news organizations will add them per their style), but most people recommend them so I've included AP datelines in some of the press release examples below. Send e-mail press releases as text only, flush left, as the body of the message. Do not format, and make sure there is no html such as color, italics, smart quotes, tabs, or varying type sizes. An em-dash − like these, for example − should be set in text as space-hyphen-space. Don't double space after periods between sentences; use one space because double spacing will goof up a publication's computerized justification. And never send information as text attachments or spreadsheet attachments. If the press release is flawlessly written, some smaller publications might run it as-is. Even if it is well-written, larger publications will rewrite it anyway, most likely to shorten it or to avoid the risk of getting caught publishing press releases (lazy journalism).

Photos: Only send a few and make sure they are good ones. They should also be sharp and technically excellent. Players in action are good (peels are always a favorite), receiving trophies is good, one wide angle or elevated "establishing shot" of players and spectators is good. Don't chop the people you photograph by having a lot of air (sky) above and legs or feet cut off below - that drives photo editors crazy. Don't bother with photos of spectators watching, out-players sitting in chairs by the deadness board, or social events. I would suggest sending each picture in its separate e-mail with its own caption; make sure the subject lines for photos are the same or similar to the subject line for the press release and make sure the photos go to the same addressee as the press release. And finally: send the raw photos. Don't ever do any retouching, cropping, or manipulating of the images in any way except perhaps to convert them to jpg to reduce file size. You don't want to subject a publication to charges of publishing altered photos; the editors are entirely capable of doing their own cropping and touch-up according to their style preferences and press needs, and they won't like your second-guessing them. And a final word: you can use this guideline, if you wish, to send information or results to the National Croquet Calendar. It will greatly be appreciated. But I'm grateful for everything I get, and you don't have to be as fancy and formal as with a major press release.

Eli.

A Press Release for a Local Clinic:

[e-mail subject line:] News Release: Croquet Clinic [body of e-mail:] Fictional Hills Croquet Club PO Box 224 Sonoma, California 95476 (707) 938-8280

Prepared September 1, 2003 by Paul Smith [e-mail, day and night telephone numbers].

For more information contact club president Peter Smith at [e-mail, day and night telephone numbers].

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Free Croquet Clinic Offered Locally

A free introduction to the growing sport of championship six-wicket croquet will be held Saturday, September 24, at the Fictional Hills Croquet Club on Orange Avenue, just outside of Sonoma [what, when, where]. Two hours of discussion and shot-making instruction will begin at 10 a.m., followed by an afternoon of doubles games in a miniature tournament format. Although the day of croquet will be free to participants, the number of openings is limited so pre-registration is required. All equipment will be supplied by the club. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and soft-soled shoes, and should bring their own refreshments, picnic lunch, and lawn chairs.

Players who are familiar with the backyard nine-wicket game will have a slight advantage, but no experience is necessary. By the end of the day, participants will be knowledgeable enough about the game to enter small tournaments and compete on their own.

To register or for more information contact Peter or Paul Smith at the Fictional Hills Croquet Club, (707) 938-8280.

[Now the b-copy:] Championship croquet is a precision game played on flat grass courts 84 by 105 feet mowed to an eighth or a sixteenth of a inch similar to golf putting greens. Six cast-iron hoops are imbedded in the court in a rectangular pattern, and each hoop must be cleared twice as players progress around the court and back. Mallets used by players can weigh up to four pounds, with 36-inch handles. It is also a complex game, the only outdoor sport where thinking and strategy can be more important than shot-making ability. Even at the top competitive level, men play with women and young play with old; the only divisions are based on ability. In 1999 17-year-old Jacques Fournier of Phoenix, Arizona, became the first American - and the youngest ever - to win the World Croquet Championship. The Fictional Hills Croquet Club was founded in 1996 when a championship court was added to the Smith residence on Orange Avenue. The club currently has 20 members paying $50 a year; new members are always welcome. #### [indicates end of copy]

A Press Release for Results of a Local Tournament:

[e-mail subject line:] News Release: Croquet Results [body of e-mail:] Fictional Hills Croquet Club PO Box 224 Sonoma, California 95476 (707) 938-8280

Prepared September 1, 2003 by Paul Smith [e-mail, day and night telephone numbers].

For more information contact club president Peter Smith at [e-mail, day and night telephone numbers].

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Charley Topps Wins Local Croquet Championship

Sonoma attorney Charley Topps won seven games, losing none, to take first place in the third annual Fictional Hills Croquet Club championship. At the end of his game against Ernie Allso, Topps ran two long breaks, clearing six hoops with one ball then eight hoops in his next turn, to win 26-19. The tournament was held Saturday and Sunday, August 13-14, at the club's court on Orange Avenue. Topps received a silver bowl for his efforts and will have his name engraved on the club's championship cup. Taking third and fourth were Peter Frank and Ellen Thomas. Saturday the tournament's eight players participated in a round-robin (all play all) in two blocks of four. The top two advanced to playoff ladders on Sunday. The Fictional Hills Croquet Club has one championship court, so two games were played simultaneously during the first day of play and in the first round of finals on Sunday. Anyone interested in learning the game is welcome to contact Peter or Paul Smith at the Fictional Hills Croquet Club, (707) 938-8280.

[b-copy:] Championship croquet is played on flat grass courts 84 by 105 feet, mowed to an eighth or a sixteenth of a inch similar to golf putting greens. Six cast-iron hoops are imbedded in the court, and each hoop must be cleared twice as players progress around the court and back. Mallets used by players can weigh up to four pounds, with 36-inch handles. Croquet is also a complex game, the only outdoor sport where thinking and strategy can be more important than shotmaking ability. There are no divisions in croquet - other than by ability - and men and women and young and old play in the same groups.

Championship Singles

1.Charley Topps
2.Ernie Allso
3.Peter Frank
4.Ellen Thomas
5.Paul Frank
6.Bob Beginner
7.Tom Tries
8.Gloria Good
#### [indicates end of copy]

A Press Release Announcing a Major Tournament:

[e-mail subject line:] News Release: National Croquet Championships United States Croquet Association 700 Florida Mango Road West Palm Beach FL 33406 (561) 478-0760, USCA@msn.com

NEWS RELEASE

Prepared September 1, 2003, by Joe Summers, [e-mail address, day and night phone numbers]

For more information contact Summers or: Tournament manager Archie Peck [e-mail address and phone numbers] USCA President Dick Brackett [e-mail address and phone numbers] USCA Office Manager Shereen Hayes [e-mail address and phone numbers]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

National Croquet Championships Set for Florida in September PALM BEACH, Fla.

The twenty-fifth annual National Croquet Championship will be held at the new National Croquet Center complex in West Palm Beach, Florida, September 17-21. [what, where, when] Over 80 players from throughout the U.S. and Canada are expected to compete in four flights of both singles and doubles on ten of the Center's 12 courts. [who, how]

[Now the b-copy:] Championship croquet is a precision game played on flat grass courts 84 by 105 feet mowed to an eighth or a sixteenth of a inch similar to golf putting greens. Six cast-iron hoops are imbedded in the court in a rectangular pattern, and each hoop must be cleared twice as players progress around the court and back. Balls are three and five-eighths inches wide and weigh one pound; mallets used by players can weigh up to four pounds, with 36-inch handles. Top players can run the entire court and peg out for the win in two turns. It is also a complex game, the only outdoor sport where thinking and strategy can be more important than shot-making ability. Even at the top competitive level, men play with women and young play with old; the only divisions are based on ability. In 1999 17-year-old Jacques Fournier of Phoenix, Arizona, became the first American - and the youngest ever - to win the World Croquet Championship. The National Croquet Center - the world's largest dedicated croquet facility - was completed in February and now serves as headquarters for the United States Croquet Association (USCA) and the Croquet Foundation of America. The center features a large clubhouse, courtside event tents, and 12 championship courts across the 10-acre site. Spectators are welcome free of charge during the preliminary rounds or the finals scheduled for Saturday morning, September 21. For information contact the USCA at the National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Road, West Palm Beach FL 33406; e-mail USCA@msn.com or telephone (561) 478-0760.

#### [indicates end of copy]

A Press Release Announcing the Results:

[e-mail subject:] News Release: National Croquet Championship Results United States Croquet Association 700 Florida Mango Road West Palm Beach FL 33406 (561) 478-0760, USCA@msn.com

NEWS RELEASE

Prepared September 21, 2003, by Joe Summers, [e-mail address, day and night phone numbers]

For more information contact Summers or: Tournament manager Archie Peck [e-mail address and phone numbers] USCA President Dick Brackett [e-mail address and phone numbers] USCA Office Manager Shereen Hayes [e-mail address and phone numbers]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Former Croquet Champion Reclaims National Title PALM BEACH, Fla.

Johnny Swift, a three-time national croquet champion from Stamping Ground, Kentucky, picked up his fourth crown by defeating Bob Jones in the final game at the National Croquet Championships in West Palm Beach, Florida. [who, what, where] Jones was only able to make one point with his first ball and set up his second ball before Swift took control of the game, ran all the hoops, and pegged out in two turns for a 26-1 final score. [why-how] The tournament was held September 17-21 in four flights of singles and doubles on ten championship croquet courts at the new National Croquet Center. [when] Swift and Jones were both undefeated in the preliminary round robin and playoff ladder before meeting in the championship flight final. "It was basically a shut-out," Jones said. "I played defensively and held back one ball, but Johnny killed me anyway. If you have to lose a game in championship croquet, this is the way to do it: 26-1 means you never had a chance to make a mistake." Swift, who won the singles titles in 1994, 1995, and 1997, also came in first in the championship doubles flight with his partner Nancy Drew from Pinehurst, North Carolina. Julie Sunderland won the first flight singles and Pat McGown and Joyce Summers won the doubles. [more details of other games, other flights, then the b-copy:] The tournament manager was Archie Peck of the National Croquet Center. Tournament director was Fred Jones, assisted by referees John Osborn, Bob Kroeger and Teddy Prentis.

[B-copy] Championship croquet is a precision game played on flat grass courts 84 by 105 feet mowed to an eighth or a sixteenth of a inch similar to putting greens. Six cast-iron hoops are imbedded in the court in a rectangular pattern, and each hoop must be cleared twice as players progress around the court and back. Balls are three and five-eighths inches wide and weigh one pound; mallets used by players can weigh up to four pounds, with 36-inch handles. It is also a complex game, the only outdoor sport where thinking and strategy can be more important than shot-making ability. Even at the top competitive level, men play with women and young play with old; the only divisions are based on ability. In 1999 17-year-old Jacques Fournier of Phoenix, Arizona, became the first American - and the youngest ever - to win the World Croquet Championship. The National Croquet Center - the world's largest dedicated croquet facility - was completed in February and now serves as headquarters for the United States Croquet Association (USCA) and the Croquet Foundation of America. The center features a large clubhouse, courtside event tents, and 12 championship courts across the 10-acre site. For information on croquet or upcoming tournaments contact the USCA at the National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Road, West Palm Beach FL 33406; e-mail USCA@msn.com or telephone (561) 478-0760.

Championship Singles

1.Johnny Swift
2.Bob Jones
3.John Osborn
4.Ron Lloyd
5.Doug Grimsley Curtis Drake (tie)
7.Jim Spoonhour Rick Wilhoite (tie)
9.Harold Brown David Bent Bill Martin Bob Kroeger
13.John Curington Rick Sheely Bob Cherry Rich Curtis
17.Dan Mahoney Dick Brackett Al Dilley Mike Jenner Archie Burchfield Ted Knopf Steve Johnston John Fournier
25.Sherif Abdelwahab Larry Stettner Joe Koenig Peter Just
29.Bill Mead Gene Fusz Steve Scalpone
32.Mike Gibbons Ren Kraft Tim Bitting

Championship Doubles

1.Johnny Swift & Nancy Drew
2.John Osborn & Harold Brown
3.Ron Lloyd & Rick Sheely
4.David Bent & Archie Peck
5.Steve Johnston & Bob Kroeger Doug Grimsley & Rich Curtis (tie)
7.John Curington & Ted Knopf Mike Jenner & Curtis Drake (tie)
9.Bill Martin & Steve Scalpone Rick Wilhoite & Archie Burchfield Bob Cherry & Dan Mahoney Dick Brackett & Gene Fusz

First Flight Singles

1.Leon Parker
2.Bob Chilton
3.Chuck Whitlow
4.Jimmy Huff
5.Bob Morgan Missy Ramey (tie) [continue results in order of strength]
#### [indicates end of copy]

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